Posts tagged tunisia

CREATIVE DISSENT: ARTS OF THE ARAB WORLD UPRISINGS

This exhibit explores the visual arts and other expressive media of the recent Arab World Uprisings.

Images are often used as communicative devices to present politicized messages. During the recent Arab World uprisings, demonstrators created images to express opposition to incumbent governments and members of the ruling elite. Over and again, activists, protesters, artists, and other individuals adopted the expressive media—including videos, photographs, painted and digital images, as well as slogans, music, and even puppets—to create visualized and performed modes of dissent within public space, both in the streets and online.

Creative Dissent: Arts of the Arab World Uprisings will be on display at the Arab American National Museum, November 8, 2013 - February 9, 2014. Lower Level Gallery, free with Museum admission.

Nine Classics of Tunisian Cinema
Cinema has long held a pivotal role in the cultural life of Tunisia, often functioning as a tool to reflect on taboos and question social norms. The beginnings of Tunisian cinema date back to the 19th century when the Lumiere brothers shot scenes in the old alleys of Tunisia in the year 1896. For film enthusiasts and critics, Tunisian cinema has come to be known as provocative, daring, and experimental. Tunisian cinema has evolved over the years, with hundreds of movies produced since independence. Below is a collection of nine award-winning classics, the first article in an ongoing Tunisia Live series on Tunisian cinema.
Image: Bab’Aziz: The Prince Who Contemplated His Soul by Nacer Khemir
A visual poem of incomparable beauty, this masterpiece from director Nacer Khemir (Wanderers of the Desert) begins with the story of a blind dervish named Bab’Aziz and his spirited granddaughter, Ishtar. Together they wander the desert in search of a great reunion of dervishes that takes place just once every thirty years. With faith as their only guide, the two journey for days through the expansive, barren landscape.

Nine Classics of Tunisian Cinema

Cinema has long held a pivotal role in the cultural life of Tunisia, often functioning as a tool to reflect on taboos and question social norms. The beginnings of Tunisian cinema date back to the 19th century when the Lumiere brothers shot scenes in the old alleys of Tunisia in the year 1896. For film enthusiasts and critics, Tunisian cinema has come to be known as provocative, daring, and experimental. Tunisian cinema has evolved over the years, with hundreds of movies produced since independence. Below is a collection of nine award-winning classics, the first article in an ongoing Tunisia Live series on Tunisian cinema.

Image: Bab’Aziz: The Prince Who Contemplated His Soul by Nacer Khemir

A visual poem of incomparable beauty, this masterpiece from director Nacer Khemir (Wanderers of the Desert) begins with the story of a blind dervish named Bab’Aziz and his spirited granddaughter, Ishtar. Together they wander the desert in search of a great reunion of dervishes that takes place just once every thirty years. With faith as their only guide, the two journey for days through the expansive, barren landscape.

Rich Mix Presents
WRITING REVOLUTION: THE VOICES FROM TUNIS TO DAMASCUS
28 June 2013 | 19:00 - 23:00
Mohamed Mesrati and Malek Sghiri, contributors to a new book ‘Writing Revolution’ (I.B.Tauris, May 2013) discuss their approaches to capturing the Arab Spring in writing. Writing Revolution is a collection of some of the best new writing born out of the Arab Spring.
Writing Revolution is a collection of some of the best new writing born out of the Arab Spring. Bringing together writers from across the Arab world, it tells the deeply moving and personal accounts of these individuals who witnessed and wrote about the profound changes shaking their region. Translated mostly from the Arabic, it is a winner of English PEN’s 2013 Award for outstanding writing in translation. Mohamed Mesrati was born in 1990 in Tripoli, Libya. He is a writer and activist currently working on his novel, Mama Pizza, whilst in exile in the UK.
Malek Sghiri is a 25-year old student, political activist, blogger, and leader of the General Union of Tunisian Students. He founded the movement Jil Jadid (New Generation) and participated in demonstrations in Tunis, Thala, and Tadamon. He was arrested and detained at the Ministry of Interior between 11 - 18 January 2011.

Rich Mix Presents

WRITING REVOLUTION: THE VOICES FROM TUNIS TO DAMASCUS

28 June 2013 | 19:00 - 23:00

Mohamed Mesrati and Malek Sghiri, contributors to a new book ‘Writing Revolution’ (I.B.Tauris, May 2013) discuss their approaches to capturing the Arab Spring in writing. Writing Revolution is a collection of some of the best new writing born out of the Arab Spring.

Writing Revolution is a collection of some of the best new writing born out of the Arab Spring. Bringing together writers from across the Arab world, it tells the deeply moving and personal accounts of these individuals who witnessed and wrote about the profound changes shaking their region. Translated mostly from the Arabic, it is a winner of English PEN’s 2013 Award for outstanding writing in translation. Mohamed Mesrati was born in 1990 in Tripoli, Libya. He is a writer and activist currently working on his novel, Mama Pizza, whilst in exile in the UK.

Malek Sghiri is a 25-year old student, political activist, blogger, and leader of the General Union of Tunisian Students. He founded the movement Jil Jadid (New Generation) and participated in demonstrations in Tunis, Thala, and Tadamon. He was arrested and detained at the Ministry of Interior between 11 - 18 January 2011.

A screening of the film Papa Hedi followed by a Q&A session with Claire Belhassine
Hedi Jouini has been described as the Frank Sinatra of the Arab world and remains one of Tunisia’s best-loved musicians. Claire Belhassine was in her 20s and living in London when she discovered that Jouini was her grandfather. This film charts Claire’s journey as she unravels the story of her grandfather’s legacy within Tunisian popular culture and the divisive effects his success had on her own family. In association with Shubbak – A Window on Contemporary Arab Culture.
Sunday 30 June, 11.00–12.30 Stevenson Lecture Theatre

A screening of the film Papa Hedi followed by a Q&A session with Claire Belhassine

Hedi Jouini has been described as the Frank Sinatra of the Arab world and remains one of Tunisia’s best-loved musicians. Claire Belhassine was in her 20s and living in London when she discovered that Jouini was her grandfather. This film charts Claire’s journey as she unravels the story of her grandfather’s legacy within Tunisian popular culture and the divisive effects his success had on her own family. In association with Shubbak – A Window on Contemporary Arab Culture.

Sunday 30 June, 11.00–12.30 Stevenson Lecture Theatre

Book Launch at SOAS: These 13 stories of young activists from the MENA region (Bahrain, Egypt, Libya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria, Jordan, Yemen, Palestine - West bank & Gaza), reveal how young Arab women and men, who come from very diverse backgrounds, regions, continents, share the same passion for their countries, the same audacity of hope for a better tomorrow, the same dream of making their country proud of them. All of the writers who were committed to this project were deeply convinced that one should not ask what their country will do for them, but rather what could they offer their countries. In a world where barriers are constantly being erased, where virtual communication turns the world to a global village, what is this strange bond that ties this Arab youth to politics and public affairs?

Book Launch at SOAS: These 13 stories of young activists from the MENA region (Bahrain, Egypt, Libya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria, Jordan, Yemen, Palestine - West bank & Gaza), reveal how young Arab women and men, who come from very diverse backgrounds, regions, continents, share the same passion for their countries, the same audacity of hope for a better tomorrow, the same dream of making their country proud of them. All of the writers who were committed to this project were deeply convinced that one should not ask what their country will do for them, but rather what could they offer their countries. In a world where barriers are constantly being erased, where virtual communication turns the world to a global village, what is this strange bond that ties this Arab youth to politics and public affairs?

eArtVolution ® is the first online gallery, professional community and educational portal for Arab artists in the MENA offering virtual exhibitions and social networking totally devoted to Art. Our deep interest in the Art field combined with our business, technology and educational know-how are our strength.

eArtVolution ® is the first online gallery, professional community and educational portal for Arab artists in the MENA offering virtual exhibitions and social networking totally devoted to Art. Our deep interest in the Art field combined with our business, technology and educational know-how are our strength.

A young Tunisian amazes the audience with an Islamic song!

A young Tunisian amazes the audience with a song Islamic! Ma sha Allah! Asked a young Tunisian sing a song live on TV Tunisia. But to the surprise of the audience, he sings a hymn to the glory of Islam and secular critical oppressive system.

IT WAS BETTER TOMORROW
Winner of Muhr Arab / Documentary /Best Director: Hinde Boujemaa (Director)
SYNOPSIS: Aida, a homeless Tunisian woman tells us nothing has changed in Tunis after the fall of Ben Ali. In the aftermath of the uprisings, she wanders from one neighbourhood to the next in search of shelter for her children. According to Aida, the authorities continue to humiliate the Tunisian people and trample on women. In the film that documents – through her - the incessant suffering of the Tunisians, despite the death of a dictatorship and the hope of a democracy.

IT WAS BETTER TOMORROW

Winner of Muhr Arab / Documentary /Best Director: Hinde Boujemaa (Director)

SYNOPSIS: Aida, a homeless Tunisian woman tells us nothing has changed in Tunis after the fall of Ben Ali. In the aftermath of the uprisings, she wanders from one neighbourhood to the next in search of shelter for her children. According to Aida, the authorities continue to humiliate the Tunisian people and trample on women. In the film that documents – through her - the incessant suffering of the Tunisians, despite the death of a dictatorship and the hope of a democracy.

The country is for the people and its glory are theirs,
Repeat with one voice and for one fate,
We are all Tunisia in the face of repressive elites!
We are all Tunisia in the face of repressive elites!
The Arab governments and who rules them are, without exception, thieves. Thieves!
The question that frames the thoughts of those who wander will not find an answer in any official channels, as long as it imports everything it has from the West

A rough translation, excerpt from a poem by Qatari poet Mohammad ibn al-Dheeb al-Ajami entitled, ”Tunisian Jasmine” supporting the uprisings in the Arab world.

Three days after the United Nations Climate Change Conference began here in Doha, a Qatari court sentenced a local poet to life in prison, a move that shocked many activists in the Gulf region and human rights observers.

25 Years of Arab Creativity
Exhibition at the Institut du Monde Arabe, “25 Years of Arab Creativity,” showcases contemporary Arab art.

25 Years of Arab Creativity

Exhibition at the Institut du Monde Arabe, “25 Years of Arab Creativity,” showcases contemporary Arab art.

The Rebirth of History: Times of Riots and Uprisings
Testing the winds of history blowing from the Arab revolts.

Tunisia, Egypt: the Eastern wind shakes the arrogance of the West.

by Alain Badiou

The Rebirth of History: Times of Riots and Uprisings

Testing the winds of history blowing from the Arab revolts.

Tunisia, Egypt: the Eastern wind shakes the arrogance of the West.

by Alain Badiou

Rosy Future
Contemporary Art from Tunisia
The road to democratisation in Tunisia is rugged and rocky. Realising the aims of the January 2011 rebellion, like for instance introducing personal freedom, is more difficult than initially expected. The revolution is not yet completed!
The exhibition “Rosy Future” provides an insight into contemporary art practices in post-revolutionary Tunisia. All artists selected for this project live and work in Tunisia. They all have been witnesses or active participants of the historical changes from January 2011.

Rosy Future

Contemporary Art from Tunisia

The road to democratisation in Tunisia is rugged and rocky. Realising the aims of the January 2011 rebellion, like for instance introducing personal freedom, is more difficult than initially expected. The revolution is not yet completed!

The exhibition “Rosy Future” provides an insight into contemporary art practices in post-revolutionary Tunisia. All artists selected for this project live and work in Tunisia. They all have been witnesses or active participants of the historical changes from January 2011.

A collection of videos from Muslim women around the world speaking about the challenges facing humankind in preparation for tomorrow’s historic conference in Tunisia. 

(Video: Interview with one of the Women of Hizb ut-Tahrir in Yemen)

US policymakers hope they can control the Arab Revolution 
The Center for a New American Security (CNAS), a US think tank is hosting a book launch for “The Arab Uprising: The Unfinished Revolutions of the New Middle East” by Dr. Marc Lynch. US policymakers hope they can control the Arab Revolution and shape the nature of change according to US interests.   

In The Arab Uprising, Dr. Lynch examines the emerging regional landscape in the Middle East, one in which, he argues, the old heavyweights - Iran, al Qaeda, even Israel - have all been disempowered, and nations like Saudi Arabia are powering a new cold war. Dr. Lynch highlights the new fault lines that are forming between forces of revolution and counter-revolution and shows what it all means for the future of U.S. foreign policy. Deeply informed by inside access to the Obama administration’s decisionmaking process and first-hand interviews with protestors, politicians, diplomats and journalists, The Arab Uprising is an unprecedented and indispensible guide to the changing lay of the land in the Middle East and North Africa.

US policymakers hope they can control the Arab Revolution

The Center for a New American Security (CNAS), a US think tank is hosting a book launch for “The Arab Uprising: The Unfinished Revolutions of the New Middle East” by Dr. Marc Lynch. US policymakers hope they can control the Arab Revolution and shape the nature of change according to US interests.   

In The Arab Uprising, Dr. Lynch examines the emerging regional landscape in the Middle East, one in which, he argues, the old heavyweights - Iran, al Qaeda, even Israel - have all been disempowered, and nations like Saudi Arabia are powering a new cold war. Dr. Lynch highlights the new fault lines that are forming between forces of revolution and counter-revolution and shows what it all means for the future of U.S. foreign policy. Deeply informed by inside access to the Obama administration’s decisionmaking process and first-hand interviews with protestors, politicians, diplomats and journalists, The Arab Uprising is an unprecedented and indispensible guide to the changing lay of the land in the Middle East and North Africa.

Global Art Uprising 
Inspired by a Year of Revolutionary Protests, Artists Across the World Seek to Occupy the Public Imagination
(Photo Credit: Gigi Ibrahim/Flickr - “Tantawi is Mubarak” reads this street portrait from Cairo)

Global Art Uprising

Inspired by a Year of Revolutionary Protests, Artists Across the World Seek to Occupy the Public Imagination

(Photo Credit: Gigi Ibrahim/Flickr - “Tantawi is Mubarak” reads this street portrait from Cairo)