Posts tagged revolution 2.0

One Year Later: Wael Ghonim at Stanford University
Wael is promoting his book, ‘Revolution 2.0: The Power of the People Is Greater Than the People in Power’ across the US, and today he is speaking at Stanford University, at an event organised by TechWadi. In one of the many interviews Wael has conducted, we particularly liked this answer to a question in the Boston Globe:

Q. Given the role social media played in the Arab Spring uprisings, and in Occupy Wall Street here, is this phenomenon likely to accelerate?
A. I believe so. The power of the Internet and social media is threefold. One, it allows people of similar interests to connect - if you feel isolated, you’re less likely to take action. Two, people can work together in crowd-sourcing ideas and making decisions that way. And three, mainstream media have become decentralized. Twenty years ago, a few large TV networks were telling people what happened, in their own way. Now someone can upload a YouTube video and within a couple of days, it’s seen by 2 million people. The big challenge is how governments will deal with this.

One Year Later: Wael Ghonim at Stanford University

Wael is promoting his book, ‘Revolution 2.0: The Power of the People Is Greater Than the People in Power’ across the US, and today he is speaking at Stanford University, at an event organised by TechWadi. In one of the many interviews Wael has conducted, we particularly liked this answer to a question in the Boston Globe:

Q. Given the role social media played in the Arab Spring uprisings, and in Occupy Wall Street here, is this phenomenon likely to accelerate?

A. I believe so. The power of the Internet and social media is threefold. One, it allows people of similar interests to connect - if you feel isolated, you’re less likely to take action. Two, people can work together in crowd-sourcing ideas and making decisions that way. And three, mainstream media have become decentralized. Twenty years ago, a few large TV networks were telling people what happened, in their own way. Now someone can upload a YouTube video and within a couple of days, it’s seen by 2 million people. The big challenge is how governments will deal with this.

Geek Gathering with Tunisian Activist Sami ben Gharbia  EFF’s Future Headquarters
Join EFF on Friday May 20th for a very special Geek Reading with Sami Ben Gharbia.  Sami is a Tunisian anti-censorship activist and blogger based in the Netherlands. He is the co-founder of nawaat.org, an award-winning collective blog about Tunisian news and politics. Sami  serves as Advocacy Director for Global Voices, where he also works on Threatened Voices, a recently developed initiative of the Global Voices Advocacy project. He is the author of a French-language book titled Journey in a Hostile World, which documents his escape from Tunisia.

Geek Gathering with Tunisian Activist Sami ben Gharbia EFF’s Future Headquarters

Join EFF on Friday May 20th for a very special Geek Reading with Sami Ben Gharbia. Sami is a Tunisian anti-censorship activist and blogger based in the Netherlands. He is the co-founder of nawaat.org, an award-winning collective blog about Tunisian news and politics. Sami serves as Advocacy Director for Global Voices, where he also works on Threatened Voices, a recently developed initiative of the Global Voices Advocacy project. He is the author of a French-language book titled Journey in a Hostile World, which documents his escape from Tunisia.

Social Media & Political Struggle

In Syria it appears that the security services have understood something about the power of social media. Syrian bloggers who use Twitter have found themselves the target of threatening messages and the #syria hashtag has been flooded with spam forcing Twitter to block the spam accounts. 

The story broke when Anas Qteish, a Syrian expatriate “blogger, translator [and] tech enthusiast” based in the United States, noted at the GlobalVoices site that a number of Twitter spam accounts had popped up after the beginning of the Syrian protests. The accounts Qteish mentioned posted primarily in Arabic. These spam accounts, with names such as @thelovelysyria, @syriabeauty, @syleague, @karamahclub, @syhumor, @dnnnews and @mbking13 all regularly posted automated tweets full of nonsense unrelated to happenings in Syria with the #syria hashtag appended. One account, for example only posted old sports scores.

Leaks from Syria’s Military Intelligence expose the government’s complicity in murder
The Facebook page for the Syrian Revolution 2011 has posted alleged leaked documents from an agent in Syria’s Military Intelligence that show how the government has sought to fight the Syrian people.
The documents disturbingly speak of creating confrontation between the army and protesters by utilising undercover agents to encourage the protesters to use weapons against the military and security forces. The documents also speak of creating sectarian divide by bombing places of worship and facilitating the assassinations of leaders from the Druze and Christian community to build public opinion against the protesters.
The government’s numerous tactics also include seeking to utilise Christian and Muslim leaders who are close to the government to engage the protesters and discourage them from protesting against the government. The following is a rough translation of some excerpts from the government’s strategy:
There is a growing trend in the category of small to imitate what happened in Tunisia and Egypt to benefit from economic conditions in the country and the atmosphere external pro-roots movements. This trend may increase after what happened in the town of Dara few days ago.
Must take advantage of past experience in dealing with hostile Muslim Brotherhood movement, and benefit from the mistakes of the Tunisian and Egyptian private that they had to neutralize the power of the army and Republican Guard from the outset and allowed the media to cover every move even gets out of control.
Media campaign is not directly in the TV and private channels and the streets around the sectarian strife and intimidate Christians and Druze of the Muslim Brotherhood and extremism, which they will face if you did not take part in ending the protests in the Sahel alert Alaleuen to defend their system and their lives that will be threatened by Sunni extremism.

Preventing the media from being present in places of riot, and punish those who convey any news does not serve the country, and do not show any laxity in this matter. - In the event that returned from filming or transfer any Fedohat or image should be a security cell media processing scenes of protests and the development of gaps which can then be displayed on the Syrian media and the networks other information and to expose these gaps and thus is being circulated in the mind of everyone to lose tapes and pictures of anti credibility. ‬

The content of the leaks will not surprise most people, and as the protests spread to the universities in Damascus and Aleppo, the government will be further shaken as the future leaders of the country make a stand against tyranny. 
ihya

Leaks from Syria’s Military Intelligence expose the government’s complicity in murder

The Facebook page for the Syrian Revolution 2011 has posted alleged leaked documents from an agent in Syria’s Military Intelligence that show how the government has sought to fight the Syrian people.

The documents disturbingly speak of creating confrontation between the army and protesters by utilising undercover agents to encourage the protesters to use weapons against the military and security forces. The documents also speak of creating sectarian divide by bombing places of worship and facilitating the assassinations of leaders from the Druze and Christian community to build public opinion against the protesters.

The government’s numerous tactics also include seeking to utilise Christian and Muslim leaders who are close to the government to engage the protesters and discourage them from protesting against the government. The following is a rough translation of some excerpts from the government’s strategy:

There is a growing trend in the category of small to imitate what happened in Tunisia and Egypt to benefit from economic conditions in the country and the atmosphere external pro-roots movements. This trend may increase after what happened in the town of Dara few days ago.
Must take advantage of past experience in dealing with hostile Muslim Brotherhood movement, and benefit from the mistakes of the Tunisian and Egyptian private that they had to neutralize the power of the army and Republican Guard from the outset and allowed the media to cover every move even gets out of control.
Media campaign is not directly in the TV and private channels and the streets around the sectarian strife and intimidate Christians and Druze of the Muslim Brotherhood and extremism, which they will face if you did not take part in ending the protests in the Sahel alert Alaleuen to defend their system and their lives that will be threatened by Sunni extremism.

Preventing the media from being present in places of riot, and punish those who convey any news does not serve the country, and do not show any laxity in this matter. - In the event that returned from filming or transfer any Fedohat or image should be a security cell media processing scenes of protests and the development of gaps which can then be displayed on the Syrian media and the networks other information and to expose these gaps and thus is being circulated in the mind of everyone to lose tapes and pictures of anti credibility. ‬

The content of the leaks will not surprise most people, and as the protests spread to the universities in Damascus and Aleppo, the government will be further shaken as the future leaders of the country make a stand against tyranny. 

ihya

Human Rights Technology & Political Revolution

The role of technology in the Arab revolution has played a significant if not a pivotal role in changing the dynamics of political power. The influence of social media is well documented. However there are also companies such as Benetech who’ve allowed activists across the world to employ new tactics to expose political oppression. Their Human Rights Data Analysis Group (HRDAG) has developed tools that allow the collection of data, which can be stored on the cloud, safe from agencies that seek to prevent such information from going public. They have developed a software tool called Martus that 

allows users to document incidents of abuse by creating bulletins, uploading them at the earliest opportunity, and storing them on redundant servers located around the world.

The software tool according to CEO of Benetech, Jim Fruchterman, is being used in the Middle East right now. Governments in the Middle East should be worried as the software has been successfully used in criminal prosecutions in Guatemala

ihya

Revolution in the Arab World
Consider it a guidebook for these revolutionary times. 
"Anyone interested in understanding the Arab revolutions should read it." — American Diplomacy

Revolution in the Arab World

Consider it a guidebook for these revolutionary times.

"Anyone interested in understanding the Arab revolutions should read it." — American Diplomacy

MENA activists bring hope online

Beirut - Hope just got a boost online. From photos of youth in Saudi Arabia rebuilding after recent floods, to blog posts about solidarity in peaceful protests in Tahrir Square, to a video about women working together to overcome stereotypes, the new social networking site, 1001 Stories of Common Ground, offers a view of what is it like to be a creative, active Arab in a globalised world, far from the stereotypes haunting international mass media.

The name, 1001 Stories (1001cgstories.org), might remind website visitors and users of the classical tales of One Thousand and One Nights. The website is in fact a unique interactive platform which promotes real life experiences of positive change, social integration, dialogue, solidarity and much more, documented through articles, videos and photos, which individuals can post on the website.

Atrocity exhibition 
The internet is generating new sources of shockingly graphic images of conflict, which the media have to figure out how to use
I do believe that truth is a good thing. And to the extent that the flood of bloody videos pouring out of Egypt, Syria, Bahrain, Libya and elsewhere right now document the truth, they are important. As commercial cable news networks (at least, in the US) evolve into something more like entertainment channels than the news outlets they began as, our access to these ugly streaming truths matters even more. Distant shots of missile drops are less likely to inspire empathy than a YouTube clip of a man in Libya whose lower jaw has just been blown off, who is still shouting for freedom. And yes, that video exists; the tireless Twitter chronicler Andy Carvin at NPR (@acarvin) tweeted it last week, along with many other videos like it. (I don’t know how he does it; I could not keep up his tolerance or his pace.)
By Xeni Jardin 
Photograph: Roberto Schmidt/AFP/Getty Images - Pro-Gaddafi attacks on Misurata have left the city’s hospitals under pressure, with doctors operating on people in corridors, say reports. 

Atrocity exhibition

The internet is generating new sources of shockingly graphic images of conflict, which the media have to figure out how to use

I do believe that truth is a good thing. And to the extent that the flood of bloody videos pouring out of Egypt, Syria, Bahrain, Libya and elsewhere right now document the truth, they are important. As commercial cable news networks (at least, in the US) evolve into something more like entertainment channels than the news outlets they began as, our access to these ugly streaming truths matters even more. Distant shots of missile drops are less likely to inspire empathy than a YouTube clip of a man in Libya whose lower jaw has just been blown off, who is still shouting for freedom. And yes, that video exists; the tireless Twitter chronicler Andy Carvin at NPR (@acarvin) tweeted it last week, along with many other videos like it. (I don’t know how he does it; I could not keep up his tolerance or his pace.)

By Xeni Jardin

Photograph: Roberto Schmidt/AFP/Getty Images - Pro-Gaddafi attacks on Misurata have left the city’s hospitals under pressure, with doctors operating on people in corridors, say reports. 

How American-Made Tech Helped Middle Eastern Governments Censor the Internet

A new Harvard University study details how American and Canadian companies provided Internet filtering and monitoring software to the Iranian government, Mubarak’s Egypt and other repressive states. It’s still going on.

Internet users in Egypt and Libya found themselves disconnected from the outside world thanks to “kill switches” that shut off network connections during civil unrest. The tech was made in the U.S.A., according to a new report.

Harvard University’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society is alleging, via the OpenNet Initiative, that government censorship of the Internet in the Middle East and North Africa depends primarily on American and Canadian technology. McAfee, Netsweeper and Websense are all accused by the report of selling censorware to the governments of Iran, Yemen, Bahrain, Egypt, Tunisia and others.

Syria Revolution Facebook group calls for civil disobedience after Assad speech 
The Facebook group ‘Syria Revolution - until freedom’ has called for an organized civil disobedience in all Syrian cities.  The administrators of the group called for an uprising in all Syrian cities after Syrian President Bashar al Assad’s speech on Wednesday, to prove that” regime has become fragile and stability and security have been weakened by the speech.”
- Syrian Revolution calls for nationwide sit-ins Friday April 1 -

Syria Revolution Facebook group calls for civil disobedience after Assad speech

The Facebook group ‘Syria Revolution - until freedom’ has called for an organized civil disobedience in all Syrian cities. The administrators of the group called for an uprising in all Syrian cities after Syrian President Bashar al Assad’s speech on Wednesday, to prove that” regime has become fragile and stability and security have been weakened by the speech.”

- Syrian Revolution calls for nationwide sit-ins Friday April 1 -

A New Arab Generation Finds Its Voice
Escalating violence has tempered the regional euphoria that followed the youth-led revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt. And yet, young people will continue to play an important role in the Arab Spring. This month, The New York Times interviewed more than two dozen of them, from Morocco to the West Bank, to find out how they consider their moment in history and their generation’s prospects for the future.

A New Arab Generation Finds Its Voice

Escalating violence has tempered the regional euphoria that followed the youth-led revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt. And yet, young people will continue to play an important role in the Arab Spring. This month, The New York Times interviewed more than two dozen of them, from Morocco to the West Bank, to find out how they consider their moment in history and their generation’s prospects for the future.

A Tunisian-Egyptian Link That Shook Arab History

There are few articles which really capture what has happened in the Arab world. This article by David D. Kirkpatrick and David E. Sanger of the New York Times is one of those articles we feel manages to evocatively convey some of the complex dynamics that make the Arab revolution so unique.

By ihya

As protesters in Tahrir Square faced off against pro-government forces, they drew a lesson from their counterparts in Tunisia: “Advice to the youth of Egypt: Put vinegar or onion under your scarf for tear gas.”

The exchange on Facebook was part of a remarkable two-year collaboration that has given birth to a new force in the Arab world — a pan-Arab youth movement dedicated to spreading democracy in a region without it. Young Egyptian and Tunisian activists brainstormed on the use of technology to evade surveillance, commiserated about torture and traded practical tips on how to stand up to rubber bullets and organize barricades.

They fused their secular expertise in social networks with a discipline culled from religious movements and combined the energy of soccer fans with the sophistication of surgeons. Breaking free from older veterans of the Arab political opposition, they relied on tactics of nonviolent resistance channeled from an American scholar through a Serbian youth brigade — but also on marketing tactics borrowed from Silicon Valley.

Syria’s Protests Growing into a Revolution

The protests have continued today after Friday prayers in Damascus. At the Omayyed mosque worshippers starting chanting:

“There is no God but God,”… in crescendo after Friday prayers. It was unclear what had sparked the chants… Dozens of security forces, who had gathered outside the mosque during the prayers, pulled out batons as soon as the chants broke out and detained at least two people, dragging away one who resisted while beating him with batons and kicking him in the nose.

Since Wednesday a number of medical students have been arrested since the protests outside the Interior Ministry in Damascus together with at least 30 other protesters according to a page on Facebook covering the protests. Protests also took place in Aleppo, Al-Hassakah, Daraa, Deir ez-Zor, and Hama. The protests are becoming better organised:

Working from Washington, Syrian pro-democracy leader and expert, Ammar Abdulhamid is in contact with the dissident network in Syria where activists are “providing information from the field,” he said. According to Ammar, “The day of protests was organized by young activists from inside Syria who used Facebook pages and groups to exchange ideas. Ammar says that activists inside Syria have been communicating with counterparts in Egypt to learn from them. Demonstrations are being planned in front of Syrian embassies in major cities in the United States and Europe. The goal is to build momentum and network with Lebanese and Egyptians to ask for their support, said Ammar.

Revolution 2.0 is gathering momentum in Syria; some tweets that caught out attention:

The Twitter accounts of the activists who brought heady days of revolution to Egypt in January and February this year paint an exhilarating picture of an uprising in real-time. Thousands of young people documented on cell phones every stage of their revolution, as it happened. This book brings together a selection of key tweets in a compelling, fast-paced narrative, allowing the story of the uprising to be told directly by the people in Cairo’s Tahrir Square.

TWEETS FROM TAHRIR 
EGYPT’S REVOLUTION AS IT UNFOLDED, IN THE WORDS OF THE PEOPLE WHO MADE IT  Edited by NADIA IDLE and ALEX NUNNS 
 Foreword by AHDAF SOUEIF 
“A feat of nearly real-time publishing.” —The New York Times 
“Without the new media the Egyptian Revolution could not have happened in the way that it did. The causes of the revolution were many; deep-rooted and long seated. The turning moment had come – but it was the instant and wide-spread nature of the new media that made it possible to recognise the moment and to push it into such an effective manifestation.”—Ahdaf Soueif, from the foreword

TWEETS FROM TAHRIR

EGYPT’S REVOLUTION AS IT UNFOLDED, IN THE WORDS OF THE PEOPLE WHO MADE IT Edited by NADIA IDLE and ALEX NUNNS

Foreword by AHDAF SOUEIF

“A feat of nearly real-time publishing.” —The New York Times

“Without the new media the Egyptian Revolution could not have happened in the way that it did. The causes of the revolution were many; deep-rooted and long seated. The turning moment had come – but it was the instant and wide-spread nature of the new media that made it possible to recognise the moment and to push it into such an effective manifestation.”—Ahdaf Soueif, from the foreword