Posts tagged politics

The Impact of War Upon the Children of Iraq and Syria

Nature Middle East this week provides heartbreaking accounts of the impact of war upon Iraqi and Syrian children:

How fear has stolen the childhood of a generation
Across the Arab world many children are showing signs of severe psychological distress and support efforts are often futile in the face of continuing raging conflicts.

The toll of war on learning for a generation
The Syrian civil war is creating an uneducated generation — burdening social systems in countries of refuge, and forcing children into illegal labour.

Iraqi children endure a crippled healthcare system
Thirty years of conflict, sanctions and a mass exodus of medical professionals has severely compromised the health of Iraqi children. And there’s no respite on the horizon.

Once proud, Iraq’s schools reel from decades of setbacks
Schools in Iraq continue to struggle, limiting learning opportunities for the country’s youth. Educational indicators show a marked decline as wars, sanctions and sectarian strife have stripped Iraq’s education system of resources.

MSF Syrian blogs are now live and feature Charlotte, an MSF psychologist, who brings to life what it’s like to work during this ongoing conflict.

MSF Syrian blogs are now live and feature Charlotte, an MSF psychologist, who brings to life what it’s like to work during this ongoing conflict.

I write to you now, my brothers and sisters in the family of Rock and Roll, to ask you to join with me, and thousands of other artists around the world, to declare a cultural boycott on Israel… Please join me and all our brothers and sisters in global civil society in proclaiming our rejection of Apartheid in Israel and occupied Palestine, by pledging not to perform or exhibit in Israel or accept any award or funding from any institution linked to the government of Israel, until such time as Israel complies with international law and universal principles of human rights.
Pink Floyd’s Roger Waters

birgaripkul:

PRAY FOR EGYPT

#StopMassacreInEgypt

#saveEGYPT

#prayforEGYPT

Morsi protesters cleared from Cairo camps - interactive
Sky Correspondent: Egypt violence is not a crowd clearing operation, it is a major military assault largely on unarmed civilians
Abigail Hauslohner ‏@ahauslohner 5m As we crouched in alley, heard protesters chant “w life, w blood, we sacrifice for Islam.” Then police opened up w heavy barrages of gunfire

Morsi protesters cleared from Cairo camps - interactive

Sky Correspondent: Egypt violence is not a crowd clearing operation, it is a major military assault largely on unarmed civilians

Abigail Hauslohner ‏@ahauslohner 5m As we crouched in alley, heard protesters chant “w life, w blood, we sacrifice for Islam.” Then police opened up w heavy barrages of gunfire

Biography of Sheikh Taqiuddin an-Nabahani

Taqiuddin bin Ibrahim bin Mustafa bin Ismail bin Yusuf an -Nabahani (founder of Hizb ut Tahrir) belonged to Bani Nabahan and he came from a village by the name of Ajzam in Haifa in Northern Palestine. Sheikh an-Nabahani was born in the village of Ajzam in 1332 Hijri or 1914 CE. His family was known for knowledge, practice of Deen and Taqwa. His father, Sheikh Ibrahim, was a jurist and a scholar of ‘Uloom e Sharai in the Ministry of Ma’arif (Knowledge and Arts). His mother was also an expert in ‘Uloom e Sharai,’ which she obtained from her father Sheikh Yusuf an-Nabahani.

Different narrations mention his maternal grandfather Sheikh Yusuf Nabahani in these words: Yusuf bin Ismail bin Yusuf bin Hassan bin Mohammad Al Nabahani Al Shafii’ – his kunya  (nickname)  was ‘Abu al Mahasin’ and he was a poet, Sufi and a literary person.  He was considered amongst one of the best judges of his time. He served as a judge in the area of Jenin affiliated  with  Nablus. Afterwards, he transferred to Istanbul where he served as a judge in the area of Kavi Sanjaq in Mosul. Then he was appointed as the head of the royal  court in Al -Azqya and Al -Quds. And then he took charge of the Court of Rights of Beirut. He has authored forty-eight books.

Makers of War 
The arms manufacturers of Aleppo used to be ordinary men—network administrators, housepainters, professors. Then came the bloody Syrian crisis. Now they must use all their desperate creativity to supply their fellow rebels with the machinery of death.
“THESE THINGS ARE FOR KILLING PEOPLE,” HE TELLS ME. “EVERY TIME I MAKE A BOMB, I FEEL SORROW.”
By Matthieu Aikins Photographs and audio interviews by Moises Saman Audio recording by Sam Tarling and Alexander Fedyushkin

Makers of War

The arms manufacturers of Aleppo used to be ordinary men—network administrators, housepainters, professors. Then came the bloody Syrian crisis. Now they must use all their desperate creativity to supply their fellow rebels with the machinery of death.

“THESE THINGS ARE FOR KILLING PEOPLE,” HE TELLS ME. “EVERY TIME I MAKE A BOMB, I FEEL SORROW.”

By Matthieu Aikins Photographs and audio interviews by Moises Saman Audio recording by Sam Tarling and Alexander Fedyushkin

A group of Syrian female detainees in the prison of Adra on hunger strike since 1/7/2013, in response to negligence of their cases by the public prosecution of the Counter-terrorism Court, and absence of approval of their respective trials.

A group of Syrian female detainees in the prison of Adra on hunger strike since 1/7/2013, in response to negligence of their cases by the public prosecution of the Counter-terrorism Court, and absence of approval of their respective trials.

WMC’s Women Under Siege is calling on women and men from Syria and those working with Syrian refugees to provide us with reports of Sexualized violence as the crisis unfolds. We are relying on you to help us discover whether rape and sexual assault are widespread - such evidence can be used to aid the international community in grasping the urgency of what is happening in Syria, and can provide the base for potential future prosecutions. Our goal is to make these atrocities visible, and to gather evidence so that one day justice may be served.
We collaborate with epidemiologists at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, as well as multiple Syrian activists and journalists. 

WMC’s Women Under Siege is calling on women and men from Syria and those working with Syrian refugees to provide us with reports of Sexualized violence as the crisis unfolds. We are relying on you to help us discover whether rape and sexual assault are widespread - such evidence can be used to aid the international community in grasping the urgency of what is happening in Syria, and can provide the base for potential future prosecutions. Our goal is to make these atrocities visible, and to gather evidence so that one day justice may be served.

We collaborate with epidemiologists at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, as well as multiple Syrian activists and journalists. 

The Dawn of the Arab Uprisings End of an Old Order? 
Edited by: Bassam Haddad, Rosie Bsheer, Ziad Abu-Rish, Foreword by: Roger Owen
The Dawn of the Arab Uprisings sheds light on the historical background and initial impact of the mass uprisings which have shaken the Arab world since December 2010. The book brings together the best writers from the online journal Jadaliyya, which has established itself as an unparalleled source of information and critical analysis on the Middle East.
The authors, many of whom live in the countries affected, provide unique understanding and first-hand accounts of events that have received superficial and partial coverage in Western and Arab media alike. While the book focuses on those states that have been most affected by the uprisings it also covers the impact on Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Lebanon, Palestine, and Iraq.
The Dawn of the Arab Uprisings covers the full range of issues involved in these historic events, from political economy and the role of social media, to international politics, gender, labour and the impact on culture, making this the ideal one-stop introduction to the events for the novice and specialist alike.

The Dawn of the Arab Uprisings End of an Old Order?

Edited by: Bassam Haddad, Rosie Bsheer, Ziad Abu-Rish, Foreword by: Roger Owen

The Dawn of the Arab Uprisings sheds light on the historical background and initial impact of the mass uprisings which have shaken the Arab world since December 2010. The book brings together the best writers from the online journal Jadaliyya, which has established itself as an unparalleled source of information and critical analysis on the Middle East.

The authors, many of whom live in the countries affected, provide unique understanding and first-hand accounts of events that have received superficial and partial coverage in Western and Arab media alike. While the book focuses on those states that have been most affected by the uprisings it also covers the impact on Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Lebanon, Palestine, and Iraq.

The Dawn of the Arab Uprisings covers the full range of issues involved in these historic events, from political economy and the role of social media, to international politics, gender, labour and the impact on culture, making this the ideal one-stop introduction to the events for the novice and specialist alike.

fastcompany:

How Skype Is Helping Topple A Dictator In Syria
This article from Mashable gives us another reason to love technology.

Skype is the go-to social network for communication between rebels, anti-government activists, journalists and officials inside and outside of Syria.
Why? Skype uses wiretapping-resistant Voice over IP (VoIP) technology, making it safer for transmitting messages while under the watchful eyes and ears of government censors. It’s free to download and easy to use, both positives for cash-strapped rebels and activists. Its video-based chatting makes it easier to identify the person on the other line, important when verifying information as legit amidst the fog of war. And it provides an easy way for Syrians to gather electronically in areas where assembling in person poses too great a security risk.

[Image:via Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty Images]

fastcompany:

How Skype Is Helping Topple A Dictator In Syria

This article from Mashable gives us another reason to love technology.

Skype is the go-to social network for communication between rebels, anti-government activists, journalists and officials inside and outside of Syria.

Why? Skype uses wiretapping-resistant Voice over IP (VoIP) technology, making it safer for transmitting messages while under the watchful eyes and ears of government censors. It’s free to download and easy to use, both positives for cash-strapped rebels and activists. Its video-based chatting makes it easier to identify the person on the other line, important when verifying information as legit amidst the fog of war. And it provides an easy way for Syrians to gather electronically in areas where assembling in person poses too great a security risk.

[Image:via Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty Images]

In Libya, Zahra’ Langhi was part of the “days of rage” movement that helped topple the dictator Qaddafi. But — then what? In their first elections, Libyans tried an innovative slate of candidates, the “zipper ballot,” that ensured equal representation from men and women of both sides. Yet the same gridlocked politics of dominance and exclusion won out. What Libya needs now, Langhi suggests, is collaboration, not competition; compassion, not rage.

Zahra’ Langhi is a gender specialist, civil society strategist, political activist advocating for peace, human rights and women’s leadership, scholar, and researcher in the field of Middle Eastern history, metaphysics, mysticism, and female spirituality in comparative religions.

A new photographic work created by Ayyam Gallery artist Tammam Azzam has captured the imaginations of the world, going viral and being shared across social media as a symbol of the power of love and human spirit in times of war. The Syrian artist has superimposed Gustav Klimt’s iconic work, The Kiss (1907 – 1908), over the walls of a war-torn building in his native country in a powerful juxtaposition of beauty and devastation. The image has been ‘liked’ by over 20,000 people and shared 14,000 times in only 5 hours.
The new work follows on from Azzam’s recent series Syrian Museum, which was exhibited at Ayyam Gallery Al Quoz, Dubai, 2 months ago, Dec 2012. Azzam merges instantly recognisable masterpieces into images from Syria’s war zones, working in various digital mediums to address the ongoing political and social upheaval in Syria, and the cycles of violence and destruction tearing his country apart.
(Image Credit: TAP77 Tammam Azzam “Freedom Graffiti” Ayyam Gallery)

A new photographic work created by Ayyam Gallery artist Tammam Azzam has captured the imaginations of the world, going viral and being shared across social media as a symbol of the power of love and human spirit in times of war. The Syrian artist has superimposed Gustav Klimt’s iconic work, The Kiss (1907 – 1908), over the walls of a war-torn building in his native country in a powerful juxtaposition of beauty and devastation. The image has been ‘liked’ by over 20,000 people and shared 14,000 times in only 5 hours.

The new work follows on from Azzam’s recent series Syrian Museum, which was exhibited at Ayyam Gallery Al Quoz, Dubai, 2 months ago, Dec 2012. Azzam merges instantly recognisable masterpieces into images from Syria’s war zones, working in various digital mediums to address the ongoing political and social upheaval in Syria, and the cycles of violence and destruction tearing his country apart.

(Image Credit: TAP77 Tammam Azzam “Freedom Graffiti” Ayyam Gallery)

A groundbreaking document published by the Open Society Foundation, on Tuesday shows that 54 countries, a quarter of the world’s nations, cooperated with the CIA’s extraordinary rendition programme.
(Image Credit: Huffington Post)

A groundbreaking document published by the Open Society Foundation, on Tuesday shows that 54 countries, a quarter of the world’s nations, cooperated with the CIA’s extraordinary rendition programme.

(Image Credit: Huffington Post)

Meet AbdelRahman Mansour, Co-Admin of ‘We Are All Khaled Said’ Page from Jadaliyya on Vimeo. Interview by Linda Herrera and filmed by Mark Lotfy