Posts tagged people

Biography of Sheikh Taqiuddin an-Nabahani

Taqiuddin bin Ibrahim bin Mustafa bin Ismail bin Yusuf an -Nabahani (founder of Hizb ut Tahrir) belonged to Bani Nabahan and he came from a village by the name of Ajzam in Haifa in Northern Palestine. Sheikh an-Nabahani was born in the village of Ajzam in 1332 Hijri or 1914 CE. His family was known for knowledge, practice of Deen and Taqwa. His father, Sheikh Ibrahim, was a jurist and a scholar of ‘Uloom e Sharai in the Ministry of Ma’arif (Knowledge and Arts). His mother was also an expert in ‘Uloom e Sharai,’ which she obtained from her father Sheikh Yusuf an-Nabahani.

Different narrations mention his maternal grandfather Sheikh Yusuf Nabahani in these words: Yusuf bin Ismail bin Yusuf bin Hassan bin Mohammad Al Nabahani Al Shafii’ – his kunya  (nickname)  was ‘Abu al Mahasin’ and he was a poet, Sufi and a literary person.  He was considered amongst one of the best judges of his time. He served as a judge in the area of Jenin affiliated  with  Nablus. Afterwards, he transferred to Istanbul where he served as a judge in the area of Kavi Sanjaq in Mosul. Then he was appointed as the head of the royal  court in Al -Azqya and Al -Quds. And then he took charge of the Court of Rights of Beirut. He has authored forty-eight books.

Rawiya is a photography collective founded by female photographers from across the Middle East. Rawiya presents an insider’s view of a region in flux balancing its contradictions while reflecting on social and political issues and stereotypes.
As a collective, Rawiya’s photographers respect the human dignity of the stories they tell, pooling resources and vision to produce in-depth photo-essays and long-term projects. Rawiya, meaning ‘she who tells a story’, brings together the experiences and photographic styles of Myriam Abdelaziz, Tamara Abdul Hadi, Laura Boushnak, Tanya Habjouqa, Dalia Khamissy and Newsha Tavakolian.
Their work is currently being exhibited at the New Art Exchange until 20 April 2013.

Rawiya is a photography collective founded by female photographers from across the Middle East. Rawiya presents an insider’s view of a region in flux balancing its contradictions while reflecting on social and political issues and stereotypes.

As a collective, Rawiya’s photographers respect the human dignity of the stories they tell, pooling resources and vision to produce in-depth photo-essays and long-term projects. Rawiya, meaning ‘she who tells a story’, brings together the experiences and photographic styles of Myriam Abdelaziz, Tamara Abdul Hadi, Laura Boushnak, Tanya Habjouqa, Dalia Khamissy and Newsha Tavakolian.

Their work is currently being exhibited at the New Art Exchange until 20 April 2013.

warkadang:

Shamsia Hassani - An Afghan Street Artist

“If you have an exhibition, most uneducated people won’t even know about it. But if you have art like graffiti in the street, everyone can see that … If we can do graffiti all over the city, there will be nobody who doesn’t know about art.”

Afghan street artist Shamsia, 24, paints on the street walls in Kabul, Afghanistan. The young artist says she hopes her public art can have a positive effect in Afghanistan. A contemporary art painter, she took to graffiti easily despite the restrictions imposed by her gender. 

In Libya, Zahra’ Langhi was part of the “days of rage” movement that helped topple the dictator Qaddafi. But — then what? In their first elections, Libyans tried an innovative slate of candidates, the “zipper ballot,” that ensured equal representation from men and women of both sides. Yet the same gridlocked politics of dominance and exclusion won out. What Libya needs now, Langhi suggests, is collaboration, not competition; compassion, not rage.

Zahra’ Langhi is a gender specialist, civil society strategist, political activist advocating for peace, human rights and women’s leadership, scholar, and researcher in the field of Middle Eastern history, metaphysics, mysticism, and female spirituality in comparative religions.

Meet AbdelRahman Mansour, Co-Admin of ‘We Are All Khaled Said’ Page from Jadaliyya on Vimeo. Interview by Linda Herrera and filmed by Mark Lotfy

So you’re forcing me to choose then, between the silence of prison and the noise of the regime?
- If I were you, I’d be more worried about the silence of the grave.

Extract from the novel ‘The Silence and the Roar' by Nihad Sirees

Fathi, a writer no longer permitted to write, makes his way through a city churned by parades for an unnamed dictator. It is a day stifled by heat and the noise of the chants, a day of people trampled, and of the brutality and bullying of the party faithful. But Fathi presses treacherously against the crowd, attempting just to visit his mother and his girlfriend.

Translated from the Arabic by Max Weiss
Publication date: 10th January 2013 
Winner of the English PEN Award 2012

TEDxSanaa was the first TEDx event in Yemen. It aims at exposing the talent, creativity, and ingenuity of Yemenis. The event brought the brightest, the most creative, and most influential Yemenis together to inspire and remind the world of the potential that Yemen has to be a good world citizen. It comes in a very critical time when Yemen, which is one of the Arab Spring countries, entered a transitional phase towards becoming a democratic, modern state. The Slogan of TEDxSanaa 2012 is “Inspiring Hope” and took place on Dec, 31st 2012.
Original Content by TEDxSanaa with some editing by ihya

TEDxSanaa was the first TEDx event in Yemen. It aims at exposing the talent, creativity, and ingenuity of Yemenis. The event brought the brightest, the most creative, and most influential Yemenis together to inspire and remind the world of the potential that Yemen has to be a good world citizen. It comes in a very critical time when Yemen, which is one of the Arab Spring countries, entered a transitional phase towards becoming a democratic, modern state. The Slogan of TEDxSanaa 2012 is “Inspiring Hope” and took place on Dec, 31st 2012.

Original Content by TEDxSanaa with some editing by ihya

Shaykh Muhammad al-Yaqoubi (Syria)

Sheikh Muhammad Yaqoubi descends from a scholarly family whose lineage goes back to the Prophet, salla Allahu ‘alayhi sallam, through his grandson Sayyiduna al-Hasan, radiya Allahu ‘anhu. Shaykh Muhammad was born in Damascus on the 13th of DhulHijja in 1382 H. As a little boy, he crawled in the Grand Omayyad Mosque and the Darwishiyya Mosque, where his father was an instructor for 40 years, and sat in the laps of some of the greatest scholars.

Since he was four-years-old, Shaykh Muhammad accompanied his father in all of his visits, gatherings, and classes, both public and private, as well as at home and outside. His father took care of him and was both his teacher and spiritual master. Under his tutelage, Shaykh Muhammad followed a solid traditional curriculum since the age of four, studying, step-by-step, the major classical works on the various disciplines of the Shari’ah as well as the instrumental disciplines. Shaykh Muhammad dutifully studied with his father over 500 books in the course of 20 years, some of them from cover-to-cover and others in portions; some are multi-volumes, and others are small concise works.

All this may seem touching – yet the projects and the people behind them command respect. Instead of running away, more and more young Lebanese like Najwa, Hind and Ziad are fighting for futures in their own country. And showing greater enthusiasm and responsibility than the state has seen for decades. Who can say what they might yet achieve?

Inspiring, Lebanon’s Young Fight for the Country’s Future with Thought & Vision 

Business Innovation in Lebanon The Other Spring by Mona Sarkis

Translated from the German by Katy Derbyshire

We are living in a very different situation compared to the past. Now, we are neither leftist nor rightist. We are just confused and we don’t know what to do. We are just trying to figure out who we are and we are in search of our own identity.

Art flourishes in a suppressed environment in a different way. I won’t say that art and literature flourishes only in a suppressed environment. All over the world, you can see resistance literature, whether it is Russia, France, Latin American countries or other suppressed nations, because now we live in a global village where censorship and iron curtain exist no more.

Urdu poet, senior journalist and anchorperson Nasira Zuberi
TIME PERSON OF THE YEAR 2012
Runner-Up: Malala Yousafzai, the Fighter
“This is Malala, I understand that what happened was tragic, but you need to stay strong. You cannot give up.” 
(Photo Credit: ASIM HAFEEZ)

TIME PERSON OF THE YEAR 2012

Runner-Up: Malala Yousafzai, the Fighter

“This is Malala, I understand that what happened was tragic, but you need to stay strong. You cannot give up.” 

(Photo Credit: ASIM HAFEEZ)

** UPDATE: BASSEL HAS BEEN TRANSFERRED FROM A CIVILIAN (ADRA) TO A MILITARY FIELD COURT, WHICH DENIES HIM A LAWYER AND WITNESSES. THIS IS BAD. PLEASE ACT NOW. **
From Al Jazeera:


Friends and colleagues of Bassel Khartabil, a Palestinian-Syrian, say they fear he is in imminent danger of a quick military trial and possible execution. A coalition of his friends and supporters said on Monday that he was transferred from a civil prison to a military prison and denied a lawyer.
Khartabil was named by Foreign Policy magazine as one of 2012’s top 100 thinkers for “fostering an open-source community in a country long on the margins of the internet’s youth culture”.

** UPDATE: BASSEL HAS BEEN TRANSFERRED FROM A CIVILIAN (ADRA) TO A MILITARY FIELD COURT, WHICH DENIES HIM A LAWYER AND WITNESSES. THIS IS BAD. PLEASE ACT NOW. **

From Al Jazeera:

Friends and colleagues of Bassel Khartabil, a Palestinian-Syrian, say they fear he is in imminent danger of a quick military trial and possible execution. A coalition of his friends and supporters said on Monday that he was transferred from a civil prison to a military prison and denied a lawyer.

Khartabil was named by Foreign Policy magazine as one of 2012’s top 100 thinkers for “fostering an open-source community in a country long on the margins of the internet’s youth culture”.

Syrian actress treads new stage in Syrian protests
Disillusioned at the level of state control even in theater and film, she joined protests last year against President Bashar al-Assad and now takes the stage at demonstrations in the city of Homs, center of resistance to his family’s four-decade rule.
Cutting her hair short like a boy and moving from house to house to evade capture, Suleiman has become one of the most recognized faces of the 10-month uprising against Assad.  She played no part in the early demonstrations that broke out in March, but a deep-seated rebellious streak - which only increased when she joined the state-run High Conservatory for Theater Arts - drew her toward the protests.
By Khaled Yacoub Oweis, Reuters

Syrian actress treads new stage in Syrian protests

Disillusioned at the level of state control even in theater and film, she joined protests last year against President Bashar al-Assad and now takes the stage at demonstrations in the city of Homs, center of resistance to his family’s four-decade rule.

Cutting her hair short like a boy and moving from house to house to evade capture, Suleiman has become one of the most recognized faces of the 10-month uprising against Assad. She played no part in the early demonstrations that broke out in March, but a deep-seated rebellious streak - which only increased when she joined the state-run High Conservatory for Theater Arts - drew her toward the protests.

By Khaled Yacoub Oweis, Reuters

I believe the Egyptian revolution really was in this sense and by definition one of the most typical revolutions in history. I would say that the Egyptian revolution was more of a revolution than some in Eastern Europe. But the achievement of the revolution is still a long way off. We are talking about nine months here; we’re still at the beginning. Still, the Egyptian revolution is one of the greatest revolutions in history – whether the analysts like it or not. If you compare our revolution to other revolutions, you see that it takes time. You are eliminating an entire regime, and we were not lucky because the military council was not in favour of the revolution. But I am still very optimistic because in the beginning, no one could ever have imagined that Mubarak would be forced to step down.
Interview with the writer Alaa Al Aswany on the Egyptian Revolution 

Essam Sharaf: Science Revolutionary

As academics joined the millions protesting in Egypt’s streets this spring, the voice of one engineer soon began leading chants. Essam Sharaf was in the thick of demonstrations in January, and he became the first prime minister of a post-revolution cabinet in March — promoting science as a solution to the country’s woes. But by November, he had resigned amid a second surge of popular protest.

The 59-year-old Sharaf was born in Egypt and earned degrees in engineering from Cairo University and Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. By 2010, he was an academic engineer at Cairo University and a fierce critic of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak’s regime. Sharaf’s stance during the uprising made him popular with the young revolutionaries. He was high on their list of candidates to lead the new transition government, along with Nobel laureate Ahmed Zewail, a chemist from the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. When Sharaf was chosen, hundreds of thousands of revolutionaries gathered to greet him in Tahrir Square. “If I can’t bring the change you want, then I will return to the lines with you,” he told them.