Posts tagged music

I write to you now, my brothers and sisters in the family of Rock and Roll, to ask you to join with me, and thousands of other artists around the world, to declare a cultural boycott on Israel… Please join me and all our brothers and sisters in global civil society in proclaiming our rejection of Apartheid in Israel and occupied Palestine, by pledging not to perform or exhibit in Israel or accept any award or funding from any institution linked to the government of Israel, until such time as Israel complies with international law and universal principles of human rights.
Pink Floyd’s Roger Waters
Listen to Nigel Kennedy with the Palestine Strings from the Edward Said National Conservatory of Music as well as members of his own Orchestra of Life performing Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons, beautiful!

Listen to Nigel Kennedy with the Palestine Strings from the Edward Said National Conservatory of Music as well as members of his own Orchestra of Life performing Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons, beautiful!

Nigel Kennedy to perform Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons with Palestine Strings ensemble from West Bank and East Jerusalem at BBC Proms
Thursday 8 August 10.15pm – 11.30pm Royal Albert Hall
17 members of the Palestine Strings, an ensemble of youngsters mainly from the West Bank and East Jerusalem, next Thursday’s appearance at the Royal Albert Hall will be more than simply the highlight of their fledgling musical careers. It is also a chance to present a face of Palestine that is in stark contrast to the prevailing image of dusty refugee camps and stone-throwing youths.
Led by British violin virtuoso Nigel Kennedy, the group will perform Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons, in an arrangement which includes some sections of Arabic music.

Nigel Kennedy to perform Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons with Palestine Strings ensemble from West Bank and East Jerusalem at BBC Proms

Thursday 8 August 10.15pm – 11.30pm Royal Albert Hall

17 members of the Palestine Strings, an ensemble of youngsters mainly from the West Bank and East Jerusalem, next Thursday’s appearance at the Royal Albert Hall will be more than simply the highlight of their fledgling musical careers. It is also a chance to present a face of Palestine that is in stark contrast to the prevailing image of dusty refugee camps and stone-throwing youths.

Led by British violin virtuoso Nigel Kennedy, the group will perform Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons, in an arrangement which includes some sections of Arabic music.

"We need freedom for true art": Interview with Syrian pianist Malek Jandali

When Syrians took to the streets in March 2011, they rebelled not only against the ruling Assad family, but also against the obscurantism that had been imposed on them for decades. Art as a whole, and music in particular, have played a crucial role in the paradigm shift that has accompanied the revolution, as Syrians discover their voices for the first time.

A new generation of Syrian artists Jandali said dictators fear the soft powers that can transform people’s mind, which is why they target artists and intellectuals. He has personally suffered this persecution. Though he left the country years ago, regime forces have repeatedly ransacked his Syrian home and severely beat his parents in retaliation to his anti-regime activity. But the revolution has allowed for the birth of a generation of artists, breaking away from the decades of official propaganda present in art production.

YouTube Video: Syria Anthem of the Free - Malek Jandali 
ســــــــــــوريـــا نشيد الأحرار- مالك جندلي

Karama is an exciting London-based band, led by Moroccan Oud player Soufian Saihi. His compositions are based around oud, clarinet, double bass and percussion. Finding inspiration from the beautiful ecstatic Gnawa, North African and Arabic classical music as well as the diverse sounds of London streets during his busking experience, the music wonders brilliantly through diverse sonic landscapes that range from Tinariwen to Alice Coltrane, superbly funky and beautifully melodic. With members from Venezuela, Spain, Japan, Morocco and the UK, Karama is an utterly unique experience.

Karama is the Arabic word for dignity

OneTaste is launching a new touring collective under the name Borderless Beats. This new collaboration brings together incredible artists that embody a universal message of freedom. Through music, Borderless Beats exercises and celebrates our ability to transcend cultural and physical borders. Let celebration be our means to connect, our path to experiencing freedom in the face of any circumstance.
Our first event is a special one-off for Shubbak Festival – a club night of live music and celebration!
Expect to see Debka dancing (the traditional Palestinian dance) overtop of dub beats, remixedPalestinian folk songs, and the poetic rhymes ofPalestine’s sharpest hip-hop emcees. The night will then burst into a full-blown party, featuringMoroccan Gnawa dance music,Mozambique/Caribbean hip-hop and grooves, and DJs spinning their latest undergroundAfrican/Middle East dance cuts.
The event will be raising awareness for the Gaza International Music and Arts Festival, which will bring artists and audiences from all over the world to Gaza to celebrate culture in Palestine.
Featured artists are Shadia Mansour, Z The People, El Far3i, Walaa Sbait, Native Sun, Electric Jalaba and DJ Sotusura.

OneTaste is launching a new touring collective under the name Borderless Beats. This new collaboration brings together incredible artists that embody a universal message of freedom. Through music, Borderless Beats exercises and celebrates our ability to transcend cultural and physical borders. Let celebration be our means to connect, our path to experiencing freedom in the face of any circumstance.

Our first event is a special one-off for Shubbak Festival – a club night of live music and celebration!

Expect to see Debka dancing (the traditional Palestinian dance) overtop of dub beats, remixedPalestinian folk songs, and the poetic rhymes ofPalestine’s sharpest hip-hop emcees. The night will then burst into a full-blown party, featuringMoroccan Gnawa dance music,Mozambique/Caribbean hip-hop and grooves, and DJs spinning their latest undergroundAfrican/Middle East dance cuts.

The event will be raising awareness for the Gaza International Music and Arts Festival, which will bring artists and audiences from all over the world to Gaza to celebrate culture in Palestine.

Featured artists are Shadia Mansour, Z The People, El Far3i, Walaa Sbait, Native Sun, Electric Jalaba and DJ Sotusura.

We cannot say precisely when the musical penetration of East and West began, but one thing is certain: composers like Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert and others could not resist the fascination of the Orient. Thus elements of Turkish music, Persian poetry and Arabic storytelling found their way straight to the heart of European culture.

Islam in European Classical Music

Nadja Kayali is a composer and music journalist living in Vienna. 2010 saw the premiere in Osnabrück of her opera Neda, which was inspired by the medieval Persian poet Nizami, but also makes reference to the Iranian protest movement.

Aleppo, a flood of suffering, how much blood is shed in my country!
I wanted to sing the pain of my country,
With a broken heart I cry for my land and the children who have become strangers in their own country.

Artists exorcise demons of Syria crisis through art

“That’s the voice we want to hear in the Arab world, not the sound of cannons!” exclaimed Nancy Ajram, a star Arab singer and jury member, as Hamdan’s fellow Syrian competitor Farah broke into tears.

Twelve leading scholars trace Islamic discourse on the performing arts to give insight into genres of pious productions throughout the world.
From “green” pop and “clean” cinema to halal songs, Islamic soaps, Muslim rap, Islamist fantasy serials, and Suficized music, the performing arts have become popular and potent avenues for Islamic piety movements, politically engaged Islamists, Islamic states, and moderate believers to propagate their religio-ethical beliefs. Muslim Rap, Halal Soaps, and Revolutionary Theater is the first book that explores this vital intersection between artistic production and Islamic discourse in the Muslim world. 
Edited by Karin van Nieuwkerk

Twelve leading scholars trace Islamic discourse on the performing arts to give insight into genres of pious productions throughout the world.

From “green” pop and “clean” cinema to halal songs, Islamic soaps, Muslim rap, Islamist fantasy serials, and Suficized music, the performing arts have become popular and potent avenues for Islamic piety movements, politically engaged Islamists, Islamic states, and moderate believers to propagate their religio-ethical beliefs. Muslim Rap, Halal Soaps, and Revolutionary Theater is the first book that explores this vital intersection between artistic production and Islamic discourse in the Muslim world. 

Edited by Karin van Nieuwkerk

QAT, COFFEE & QAMBUS: RAW 45s FROM YEMEN
Compiled by Chris Menist, Qat, Coffee & Qambus: Raw 45s from Yemen features vintage oud and vocal music inspired by the qat-chewing, coffee-sipping, qambus-playing culture of Yemen. Although part of the classical Arabic musical tradition, the music of Yemen takes its rhythmic lead as much from the East African coast (a mere 20 miles across the Red Sea) as the surrounding Arab Peninsula. Little has been written about the music and culture of one of the world’s oldest civilizations, and each 45rpm disc gives a small glimpse of the poetic tradition, the unique local oud styles as well as an insight into people’s day-to-day lives, or the highs and lows of human relationships. Overall, the compilation gives a flavor of the sights and sounds of Yemen, with detailed notes that tell the story of the hunt for music that has mostly lain forgotten in the antique markets of the capital, until now.

QAT, COFFEE & QAMBUS: RAW 45s FROM YEMEN

Compiled by Chris Menist, Qat, Coffee & Qambus: Raw 45s from Yemen features vintage oud and vocal music inspired by the qat-chewing, coffee-sipping, qambus-playing culture of Yemen. Although part of the classical Arabic musical tradition, the music of Yemen takes its rhythmic lead as much from the East African coast (a mere 20 miles across the Red Sea) as the surrounding Arab Peninsula.

Little has been written about the music and culture of one of the world’s oldest civilizations, and each 45rpm disc gives a small glimpse of the poetic tradition, the unique local oud styles as well as an insight into people’s day-to-day lives, or the highs and lows of human relationships. Overall, the compilation gives a flavor of the sights and sounds of Yemen, with detailed notes that tell the story of the hunt for music that has mostly lain forgotten in the antique markets of the capital, until now.

A young Tunisian amazes the audience with an Islamic song!

A young Tunisian amazes the audience with a song Islamic! Ma sha Allah! Asked a young Tunisian sing a song live on TV Tunisia. But to the surprise of the audience, he sings a hymn to the glory of Islam and secular critical oppressive system.

Malek Jandali Freedom Qashoush Symphony

Malek Jandali has released a new album “Emessa”, titled after the ancient name for Homs, one of the cities at the centre of the Syrian uprising. The record features songs explicitly about the uprising.

It’s a threat when you have a true artist or a beautiful Syrian symphony, that’s being truthful, that’s playing in harmony - that’s a threat to the regime. They want individuals that they can control and say, ‘Go and sing for Assad and go and sing for our army’. (Malek Jandali)

Cultural dissent is vital to a revolution, and is greatly feared for its subversive power.

The importance of cultural dissent lies in four things primarily. By using peaceful means, artists reinforce the peaceful nature of the protests, even in the face of brutal repression. Cultural dissent also sways the undecided, allowing them to imagine a world after dictatorship. In his public speeches since the uprising began, President Al Assad has often talked about the future, about what his government will do months and years down the line.

The importance of this is not lost on his listeners: it is verbal reinforcement of the permanence of the regime. The regime, in this telling, is not going anywhere, so any opposition will eventually be punished: weeks or months or years later, the regime will still find its opponents. Cultural dissent attacks this narrative, showing that the regime is far from permanent. By legitimising dissent, the undecided middle see that a world after Mr Al Assad is possible and it pushes them to join the protests, to move from the middle ground towards the protest camp.

Article edited from Faisal Al Yafai’s piece in The National

"Blitz the Ambassador" is a track taken from the album Suerti by Morocco’s fusion singer Oum El Ghaith Benessahraoui, aka Oum. In an interview with Qantara, Benessahraoui said about her new album:

Most songs are about love and sensuality. But I also want to show just how much Morocco is the gateway between Africa and Europe. The track “Harguin” tells of African refugees who are dreaming of Europe. I recorded this track with ‘Blitz the Ambassador’, a rapper from Ghana who now lives in New York. Another track is about globalization. Unlike my first album, Likum, almost all of the music on this album is acoustic. All the instruments were recorded in acoustic. I wanted to hear more of myself on this album, less arrangements and effects.

Iranian rappers sing for people of Homs in Syria

This song is produced by Emad Ghavidel and Hamed Fard for the people of Homs in Syria.