Posts tagged lebanon

Infiltrators Directed by Khaled Jarrar
Shot hand-held, often covertly and at some personal risk, Infiltrators draws audiences into a high stakes “game” of cat and mouse, chronicling the travails of Palestinians seeking routes through, under, around and over a bewildering matrix of barriers in the West Bank. Jarrar’s doc swept the board at last year’s Dubai International Film Festival, winning the Muhr Arab Documentary Prize, the Special Jury Prize, and the International Critics Prize.

Infiltrators Directed by Khaled Jarrar

Shot hand-held, often covertly and at some personal risk, Infiltrators draws audiences into a high stakes “game” of cat and mouse, chronicling the travails of Palestinians seeking routes through, under, around and over a bewildering matrix of barriers in the West Bank. Jarrar’s doc swept the board at last year’s Dubai International Film Festival, winning the Muhr Arab Documentary Prize, the Special Jury Prize, and the International Critics Prize.

THE LEBANESE ROCKET SOCIETY
Cambridge Film Festival 20 September & 21 September 2013
In the 1960s, when the USA and USSR’s battle to dominate both earth and space formed the dominant historical narrative, few would have expected to find a small enclave of budding scientists in Beirut were setting about building a Lebanese space program. With ballistics technology and the formula for rocket fuel both highly guarded secrets during the Cold War, young professor Manoug Manougian and his students manufactured their own haphazard carapaces, launch-pads and propellant, using budget materials from the local shops. When their tinkering started paying off, the military became interested, and their ramshackle operation became a going national concern. Ultimately, external factors such as the Arab-Israeli war meant Manougian’s program was cut short. But the story, largely untold even in Lebanon, remains truly inspiring. Charmingly narrated by the two co-directors, it’s a quirky tale of innocent, starry-eyed ambition, cheerfully at odds with a historical backdrop of fear and military brinkmanship. 

THE LEBANESE ROCKET SOCIETY

Cambridge Film Festival 
20 September & 21 September 2013

In the 1960s, when the USA and USSR’s battle to dominate both earth and space formed the dominant historical narrative, few would have expected to find a small enclave of budding scientists in Beirut were setting about building a Lebanese space program. With ballistics technology and the formula for rocket fuel both highly guarded secrets during the Cold War, young professor Manoug Manougian and his students manufactured their own haphazard carapaces, launch-pads and propellant, using budget materials from the local shops. When their tinkering started paying off, the military became interested, and their ramshackle operation became a going national concern. Ultimately, external factors such as the Arab-Israeli war meant Manougian’s program was cut short. But the story, largely untold even in Lebanon, remains truly inspiring. Charmingly narrated by the two co-directors, it’s a quirky tale of innocent, starry-eyed ambition, cheerfully at odds with a historical backdrop of fear and military brinkmanship. 

Syrian Civil War: Artists Displaced By Conflict Find Refuge (And Beauty) In Lebanese Artists’ Colony
ARA is a dynamic space for communication and creation. It is a collective community of eclectic forms of expression. We offer residency and commission artistic projects for young Syrian artists.
“With this war, Syria’s artists don’t have an emotional or physical place to work, so I offer them this,” said Raghad Mardini, a Syrian single mother of four and an accomplished civil engineer with a predilection for art. She renovated the stable in 2011 for this purpose, and runs the residency program for displaced and fleeing Syrian artists. So far she has hosted 24 artists, two at a time each month.
The Founder’s Vision
"The project arose out of my lifelong passion for a particular creative atmosphere I discovered years ago in the studios and ateliers of Damascus, an artistic eco-system which I lived and breathed and which produced so many of my favourite artists, many of them friends. The stables at Aley were a relic from the Civil War, which I found unloved like the walnut tree suffering sadly in the grounds.
As a civil engineer, I saw the opportunity to turn the stables into something beautiful and also symbolic: ruined and in trouble but still possessing an inner beauty it was impossible to mistake, and which the right amount of love and energy could revive into something productive and new. It’s a space of freedom and hope for every young Syrian artist.”
Raghad Mardini

Syrian Civil War: Artists Displaced By Conflict Find Refuge (And Beauty) In Lebanese Artists’ Colony

ARA is a dynamic space for communication and creation. It is a collective community of eclectic forms of expression. We offer residency and commission artistic projects for young Syrian artists.

“With this war, Syria’s artists don’t have an emotional or physical place to work, so I offer them this,” said Raghad Mardini, a Syrian single mother of four and an accomplished civil engineer with a predilection for art. She renovated the stable in 2011 for this purpose, and runs the residency program for displaced and fleeing Syrian artists. So far she has hosted 24 artists, two at a time each month.

The Founder’s Vision

"The project arose out of my lifelong passion for a particular creative atmosphere I discovered years ago in the studios and ateliers of Damascus, an artistic eco-system which I lived and breathed and which produced so many of my favourite artists, many of them friends. The stables at Aley were a relic from the Civil War, which I found unloved like the walnut tree suffering sadly in the grounds.

As a civil engineer, I saw the opportunity to turn the stables into something beautiful and also symbolic: ruined and in trouble but still possessing an inner beauty it was impossible to mistake, and which the right amount of love and energy could revive into something productive and new. It’s a space of freedom and hope for every young Syrian artist.”

Raghad Mardini

Book Launch at SOAS: These 13 stories of young activists from the MENA region (Bahrain, Egypt, Libya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria, Jordan, Yemen, Palestine - West bank & Gaza), reveal how young Arab women and men, who come from very diverse backgrounds, regions, continents, share the same passion for their countries, the same audacity of hope for a better tomorrow, the same dream of making their country proud of them. All of the writers who were committed to this project were deeply convinced that one should not ask what their country will do for them, but rather what could they offer their countries. In a world where barriers are constantly being erased, where virtual communication turns the world to a global village, what is this strange bond that ties this Arab youth to politics and public affairs?

Book Launch at SOAS: These 13 stories of young activists from the MENA region (Bahrain, Egypt, Libya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria, Jordan, Yemen, Palestine - West bank & Gaza), reveal how young Arab women and men, who come from very diverse backgrounds, regions, continents, share the same passion for their countries, the same audacity of hope for a better tomorrow, the same dream of making their country proud of them. All of the writers who were committed to this project were deeply convinced that one should not ask what their country will do for them, but rather what could they offer their countries. In a world where barriers are constantly being erased, where virtual communication turns the world to a global village, what is this strange bond that ties this Arab youth to politics and public affairs?

Lebanese Victims of Torture 
Remembering Palmyra 
They were abducted and tortured. Now they have taken to the stage: In “The German Chair”, Lebanese survivors of Syrian jails recreate the horrors of the civil war in a play. By Jannis Hagmann

Lebanese Victims of Torture

Remembering Palmyra

They were abducted and tortured. Now they have taken to the stage: In “The German Chair”, Lebanese survivors of Syrian jails recreate the horrors of the civil war in a play. By Jannis Hagmann

For the 7th consecutive edition, Beirut DC is organizing Ayam Beirut Al Cinema’iya (Cinema Days of Beirut) Arab Film Festival, which is taking place from the 15th until the 24th of March 2013 in Cinema Metropolis Empire Sofil, Ashrafieh.
This edition includes more than 50 films, varying between feature length films, documentaries and short films, in addition to panels, networking sessions and master classes.
What is distinctive in this edition is that it witnesses the birth of a new Arab cinema coming from new countries, marking their spot on the international cinema route for the first time. The opening film, “Wadjda” by Saudi filmmaker Haifa Al Mansour just participated in Venice Film Festival, one of the most prestigious international film festivals and took several awards at the Dubai International Film Festival.

For the 7th consecutive edition, Beirut DC is organizing Ayam Beirut Al Cinema’iya (Cinema Days of Beirut) Arab Film Festival, which is taking place from the 15th until the 24th of March 2013 in Cinema Metropolis Empire Sofil, Ashrafieh.

This edition includes more than 50 films, varying between feature length films, documentaries and short films, in addition to panels, networking sessions and master classes.

What is distinctive in this edition is that it witnesses the birth of a new Arab cinema coming from new countries, marking their spot on the international cinema route for the first time. The opening film, “Wadjda” by Saudi filmmaker Haifa Al Mansour just participated in Venice Film Festival, one of the most prestigious international film festivals and took several awards at the Dubai International Film Festival.

We have fine and talented artists in the Arab world but circumstances are not in their favour. We reside in a spiritual part of the world and the soil of our region breathes culture. Culture is ingrained in us. Old Damascus is an accumulation of culture and civilisation throughout the ages. How do you expect artists not to emerge from this land? Our artists are committed to their humanitarian causes and those of their countries. They are mirrors of their societies.

Razan Chatti, a set designer and scenographer, is cultivating young talent under the auspices of the Afak (Horizons) foundation, which she launched in 2011.

Through Afak, she organises traveling exhibitions for artists from Lebanon, Syria and Iraq, whose works carry powerful humanitarian messages.

All this may seem touching – yet the projects and the people behind them command respect. Instead of running away, more and more young Lebanese like Najwa, Hind and Ziad are fighting for futures in their own country. And showing greater enthusiasm and responsibility than the state has seen for decades. Who can say what they might yet achieve?

Inspiring, Lebanon’s Young Fight for the Country’s Future with Thought & Vision 

Business Innovation in Lebanon The Other Spring by Mona Sarkis

Translated from the German by Katy Derbyshire

Beirut 56th Annual International Arab Book Fair 2012

Spring fever: Arab writers reflect on a tumultuous year

Eight Arab writers reflect on the Arab Revolution:

Tamim al-Barghouti, a Palestinian poet. He is a visiting assistant professor at Georgetown University’s Centre for Contemporary Arab Studies.

Laila Lalami, a Moroccan-born writer and critic, and associate professor at the University of California, Riverside.

Alaa Abd el-Fattah, an Egyptian blogger. He was jailed for 56 days for refusing to recognise the authority of the military prosecutor. He was released on December 25. 

Mourid Barghouti, a Palestinian poet.

Arab Social Media Report

by the Dubai School of Government

The societal and political transformations sweeping the Arab region have empowered large segments of the region’s population. Many stereotypes have been shattered, with Arab youth, “netizens” and women becoming the main drivers for regional change. Arab women in particular have become more engaged in political and civic actions, playing a critical leading role in the rapid and historic changes that have swept the region. Meanwhile, the debate about the role of social media in these transformations has reached policy making circles at the regional and global levels.

Throughout 2011, social media usage continued to grow significantly across the Arab world, coupled with major shifts in usage trends. From merely being used as a tool for social networking and entertainment, social media now infiltrates almost every aspect of the daily lives of millions of Arabs, affecting the way they interact socially, do business, interact with government, or engage in civil society movements. By the end of 2011, Arab users’ utilization of social media had evolved to encompass civic engagement, political participation, entrepreneurial efforts, and social change.

Conference on Cultural Freedom in the Levant, Censorship and the Arab Spring Prospects
Arab artists, intellectuals, journalists and cultural figures called for taking a stronger stand against censorship at a conference in Beirut.

Conference on Cultural Freedom in the Levant, Censorship and the Arab Spring Prospects

Arab artists, intellectuals, journalists and cultural figures called for taking a stronger stand against censorship at a conference in Beirut.

Rania Matar: A Girl and her Room
1 July to 23 July 2011 at the The Mosaic Rooms London
As part of the Shubbak Festival, the Mosaic Rooms presents a stunning exhibition of photographic portraits by award-winning Arab-American photographer, Rania Matar.

The exhibition looks at teenage girls in America, Matar’s native Lebanon and Palestine. The result is a moving and sometimes unsettling study of the chasm between childhood and adulthood.

ihya
(Photo of Elham 18, Shatila Refugee Camp Beirut, 2009 by Rania Matar)

Rania Matar: A Girl and her Room

1 July to 23 July 2011 at the The Mosaic Rooms London

As part of the Shubbak Festival, the Mosaic Rooms presents a stunning exhibition of photographic portraits by award-winning Arab-American photographer, Rania Matar.

The exhibition looks at teenage girls in America, Matar’s native Lebanon and Palestine. The result is a moving and sometimes unsettling study of the chasm between childhood and adulthood.

ihya

(Photo of Elham 18, Shatila Refugee Camp Beirut, 2009 by Rania Matar)

“Where do we go now?" the new film by actress and director Nadine Labaki, tells the story of a group of women in a village in Lebanon trying to prevent religious tensions from arising between Muslims and Christians, as a consequence of outside influences. The film premièred at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival, as part of the Prize Un Certain Regard, a prize to recognise young talent and encourage innovative work. 
ihya

Where do we go now?" the new film by actress and director Nadine Labaki, tells the story of a group of women in a village in Lebanon trying to prevent religious tensions from arising between Muslims and Christians, as a consequence of outside influences. The film premièred at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival, as part of the Prize Un Certain Regard, a prize to recognise young talent and encourage innovative work. 

ihya

I see the role of a writer, especially now and especially coming from an Arab country, as quite heavy… The people practically invested us with tackling problems that affect them directly. I’m a writer but I’m also a citizen affected by what’s happening. This is how I see being a writer.
Moroccan-born French poet and writer Tahar Ben Jalloun speaking about engaging with the world’s political realities at the Beirut Spring Festival.