Posts tagged islam

Chastity

Although she was ready to give
herself to me, I abstained
and did not accept the temptation Satan offered.

She came unveiled in the night,
illuminated by her face,
night put aside its shadowy
veils as well.

Each one of her glances
could cause hearts to turn over.

But I clung to the divine precept
that condemns lust and reined in
the capricious horses of my passion
so that my instinct would not rebel against chastity.

And so I passed the night with her
like a thirsty little camel
whose muzzle keeps it from nursing.

by Ibn Faraj (10th Century)

Poems of Arab Andalusia
Publisher: City Lights Publishers 

ALWAN AL HAIA 
“[Say: “Our life is] the color of Allah! And who can color better than Allah? And it is He Whom we worship.” Al Baqarah 2:138
Painting by Dana Awartani, a half-Palestinian half-Saudi Arabian artist born and raised in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Through research and her own practice Dana was particularly drawn to the perennial philosophy to which geometry and all of the traditional arts subscribe. She found geometry to be representative of a timeless language of aesthetics which, through its mathematical and visually democratic origin represents a universal language of beauty and harmony; in essence, geometry is the perfect reflection of God’s infinity and manifestation on earth as found in nature and His creation. Geometry therefore combines artistic creativity with an inherent logical system informed by Divine principles.
Read an interview with her here. 
(Colours of LIfe: Shell gold & natural pigments on prepared paper 28.5 x 28.5 cm) 

ALWAN AL HAIA

“[Say: “Our life is] the color of Allah! And who can color better than Allah? And it is He Whom we worship.” Al Baqarah 2:138

Painting by Dana Awartani, a half-Palestinian half-Saudi Arabian artist born and raised in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Through research and her own practice Dana was particularly drawn to the perennial philosophy to which geometry and all of the traditional arts subscribe. She found geometry to be representative of a timeless language of aesthetics which, through its mathematical and visually democratic origin represents a universal language of beauty and harmony; in essence, geometry is the perfect reflection of God’s infinity and manifestation on earth as found in nature and His creation. Geometry therefore combines artistic creativity with an inherent logical system informed by Divine principles.

Read an interview with her here

(Colours of LIfe: Shell gold & natural pigments on prepared paper 28.5 x 28.5 cm) 

From Inside: A Diary of Syria

It’s been almost three years of a most shocking mixture of pain and hope in Syria. While the pain manifests itself with bombardments and continuous detentions, hope manifests itself with the outburst of new creative talents.

Extraordinary young photographers and filmmakers have emerged through the professional training programme TAKWEEN: a project initiated by DOX BOX Int’l Documentary Film Festival (Syria) and the Prince Claus Fund (the Netherlands).

In order to share these unique perspectives with the rest of the world, DOX BOX and the Prince Claus Fund have created From Inside: A Diary of Syria, a photography and video blog showcasing the work of three young Syrian photographers each month. Through the ‘diary entries’, photographers and filmmakers (ages 18-25) from across Syria share their everyday lives through their words and outstanding photos.

(Photo Credits: Abd Doumany Douma – 7 November 2012/Abd Doumany Cradle of Revolution Near Damascus – 22 May 2013/Bury the Martyrs by Bassam Al-Hakeem Damascus Barzah – 12 May 2013)

Lost Enlightenment: Central Asia’s Golden Age from the Arab Conquest to Tamerlane by S. Frederick Starr 
In this sweeping and richly illustrated history, S. Frederick Starr tells the fascinating but largely unknown story of Central Asia’s medieval enlightenment through the eventful lives and astonishing accomplishments of its greatest minds—remarkable figures who built a bridge to the modern world. Because nearly all of these figures wrote in Arabic, they were long assumed to have been Arabs. In fact, they were from Central Asia—drawn from the Persianate and Turkic peoples of a region that today extends from Kazakhstan southward through Afghanistan, and from the easternmost province of Iran through Xinjiang, China.
Lost Enlightenment recounts how, between the years 800 and 1200, Central Asia led the world in trade and economic development, the size and sophistication of its cities, the refinement of its arts, and, above all, in the advancement of knowledge in many fields. Central Asians achieved signal breakthroughs in astronomy, mathematics, geology, medicine, chemistry, music, social science, philosophy, and theology, among other subjects. They gave algebra its name, calculated the earth’s diameter with unprecedented precision, wrote the books that later defined European medicine, and penned some of the world’s greatest poetry. One scholar, working in Afghanistan, even predicted the existence of North and South America—five centuries before Columbus. Rarely in history has a more impressive group of polymaths appeared at one place and time. No wonder that their writings influenced European culture from the time of St. Thomas Aquinas down to the scientific revolution, and had a similarly deep impact in India and much of Asia.

Lost Enlightenment: Central Asia’s Golden Age from the Arab Conquest to Tamerlane by S. Frederick Starr

In this sweeping and richly illustrated history, S. Frederick Starr tells the fascinating but largely unknown story of Central Asia’s medieval enlightenment through the eventful lives and astonishing accomplishments of its greatest minds—remarkable figures who built a bridge to the modern world. Because nearly all of these figures wrote in Arabic, they were long assumed to have been Arabs. In fact, they were from Central Asia—drawn from the Persianate and Turkic peoples of a region that today extends from Kazakhstan southward through Afghanistan, and from the easternmost province of Iran through Xinjiang, China.

Lost Enlightenment recounts how, between the years 800 and 1200, Central Asia led the world in trade and economic development, the size and sophistication of its cities, the refinement of its arts, and, above all, in the advancement of knowledge in many fields. Central Asians achieved signal breakthroughs in astronomy, mathematics, geology, medicine, chemistry, music, social science, philosophy, and theology, among other subjects. They gave algebra its name, calculated the earth’s diameter with unprecedented precision, wrote the books that later defined European medicine, and penned some of the world’s greatest poetry. One scholar, working in Afghanistan, even predicted the existence of North and South America—five centuries before Columbus. Rarely in history has a more impressive group of polymaths appeared at one place and time. No wonder that their writings influenced European culture from the time of St. Thomas Aquinas down to the scientific revolution, and had a similarly deep impact in India and much of Asia.

Nur: Light in Art and Science from the Islamic World
Nur: Light in Art and Science from the Islamic World, spanning more than ten centuries and including ancient artworks and objects from throughout the Islamic world. The exhibition will be on display in Seville from October before travelling to the Dallas Museum of Art (USA) in Spring 2014.
Featuring 150 objects from public and private collections in Europe, North Africa, the Middle East, and the United States, Nur: Light in Art and Science from the Islamic World explores the use and meaning of light in Islamic art and science, and demonstrates how light is a unifying motif in Islamic civilizations worldwide. The exhibition, directed and curated by Islamic art and culture expert Dr. Sabiha Al Khemir, includes numerous unprecedented objects that have never been displayed in public, from gold and silver inlaid metalwork through to anatomical illustrations.
The Nur: Light in Art and Science from the Islamic World exhibition will be housed at the Focus-Abengoa Foundation’s headquarters in the historic 17th century building, the Hospital de los Venerables Sacerdotes, from 25 October 2013 to 9 February 2014. It will subsequently travel to the United States and be on view at the Dallas Museum of Art in Texas, from 30 March 2014 to 29 June 2014. Deriving its title from the Arabic word for light in both the physical and metaphysical sense, 

Nur: Light in Art and Science from the Islamic World

Nur: Light in Art and Science from the Islamic World, spanning more than ten centuries and including ancient artworks and objects from throughout the Islamic world. The exhibition will be on display in Seville from October before travelling to the Dallas Museum of Art (USA) in Spring 2014.

Featuring 150 objects from public and private collections in Europe, North Africa, the Middle East, and the United States, Nur: Light in Art and Science from the Islamic World explores the use and meaning of light in Islamic art and science, and demonstrates how light is a unifying motif in Islamic civilizations worldwide. The exhibition, directed and curated by Islamic art and culture expert Dr. Sabiha Al Khemir, includes numerous unprecedented objects that have never been displayed in public, from gold and silver inlaid metalwork through to anatomical illustrations.

The Nur: Light in Art and Science from the Islamic World exhibition will be housed at the Focus-Abengoa Foundation’s headquarters in the historic 17th century building, the Hospital de los Venerables Sacerdotes, from 25 October 2013 to 9 February 2014. It will subsequently travel to the United States and be on view at the Dallas Museum of Art in Texas, from 30 March 2014 to 29 June 2014. Deriving its title from the Arabic word for light in both the physical and metaphysical sense, 

A very personal project started when artist Amani Alsaad began having a neurological problem. By viewing her personal MRI brain scans, she began to feel optimistic about her neurological problem, which disturbed her studies private life sometimes. She started planting roses inside her head and welcoming butterflies and adding quotes from the Holy Quran, about faith In predestination, being thankful, faithful and patient about things because they are predestined, and quoted from the holy Quran because in Islam we have (AlRuq’ya) Quran medication.
Her work is being shown as part of the Nour Festival at the Chelsea Theatre, 1 October to 30 November.
(Image: Taking care of the Roses by Amani Alsaad)

A very personal project started when artist Amani Alsaad began having a neurological problem. By viewing her personal MRI brain scans, she began to feel optimistic about her neurological problem, which disturbed her studies private life sometimes. She started planting roses inside her head and welcoming butterflies and adding quotes from the Holy Quran, about faith In predestination, being thankful, faithful and patient about things because they are predestined, and quoted from the holy Quran because in Islam we have (AlRuq’ya) Quran medication.

Her work is being shown as part of the Nour Festival at the Chelsea Theatre, 1 October to 30 November.

(Image: Taking care of the Roses by Amani Alsaad)

'Hijab Outcry' In Sweden To Protest Violence Against Muslim Women
@hijabuppropet

'Hijab Outcry' In Sweden To Protest Violence Against Muslim Women

@hijabuppropet

Morsi protesters cleared from Cairo camps - interactive
Sky Correspondent: Egypt violence is not a crowd clearing operation, it is a major military assault largely on unarmed civilians
Abigail Hauslohner ‏@ahauslohner 5m As we crouched in alley, heard protesters chant “w life, w blood, we sacrifice for Islam.” Then police opened up w heavy barrages of gunfire

Morsi protesters cleared from Cairo camps - interactive

Sky Correspondent: Egypt violence is not a crowd clearing operation, it is a major military assault largely on unarmed civilians

Abigail Hauslohner ‏@ahauslohner 5m As we crouched in alley, heard protesters chant “w life, w blood, we sacrifice for Islam.” Then police opened up w heavy barrages of gunfire

Exhibition: CAPTIVATING CALLIGRAPHY
1 August - 20 August 2013

Bin Qullander, a young Pakistani quickly gaining international recognition, an exhibition of his work on show in Art Couture, Dubai

The exhibition celebrates the calligraphy of four well-known and emerging artists.

Biography of Sheikh Taqiuddin an-Nabahani

Taqiuddin bin Ibrahim bin Mustafa bin Ismail bin Yusuf an -Nabahani (founder of Hizb ut Tahrir) belonged to Bani Nabahan and he came from a village by the name of Ajzam in Haifa in Northern Palestine. Sheikh an-Nabahani was born in the village of Ajzam in 1332 Hijri or 1914 CE. His family was known for knowledge, practice of Deen and Taqwa. His father, Sheikh Ibrahim, was a jurist and a scholar of ‘Uloom e Sharai in the Ministry of Ma’arif (Knowledge and Arts). His mother was also an expert in ‘Uloom e Sharai,’ which she obtained from her father Sheikh Yusuf an-Nabahani.

Different narrations mention his maternal grandfather Sheikh Yusuf Nabahani in these words: Yusuf bin Ismail bin Yusuf bin Hassan bin Mohammad Al Nabahani Al Shafii’ – his kunya  (nickname)  was ‘Abu al Mahasin’ and he was a poet, Sufi and a literary person.  He was considered amongst one of the best judges of his time. He served as a judge in the area of Jenin affiliated  with  Nablus. Afterwards, he transferred to Istanbul where he served as a judge in the area of Kavi Sanjaq in Mosul. Then he was appointed as the head of the royal  court in Al -Azqya and Al -Quds. And then he took charge of the Court of Rights of Beirut. He has authored forty-eight books.

Curating Syria’s revolutionary art

The revolution established a space for ingenuity that has astounded us, the Syrians, before even making its mark on the rest of the world, and we wonder, where had all this talent in satire, art, and innovation been?

The outburst of the uprising against oppression and tyranny brought on a surge of these remarkable, latent energies, the spontaneous and the organized, in a way never before seen in all of Syria’s years marked by repression and injustice. History relays similar experiences. This project aims to archive all the intellectual and artistic expressions in the age of revolution; it is writing, recording, and collecting stories of the Syrian people, and those experiences through which they have regained meaning of their social, political and cultural lives.

(Image Credit of football pitch: Ramadan Kareem by Ammar Al-Beik)

Nine Classics of Tunisian Cinema
Cinema has long held a pivotal role in the cultural life of Tunisia, often functioning as a tool to reflect on taboos and question social norms. The beginnings of Tunisian cinema date back to the 19th century when the Lumiere brothers shot scenes in the old alleys of Tunisia in the year 1896. For film enthusiasts and critics, Tunisian cinema has come to be known as provocative, daring, and experimental. Tunisian cinema has evolved over the years, with hundreds of movies produced since independence. Below is a collection of nine award-winning classics, the first article in an ongoing Tunisia Live series on Tunisian cinema.
Image: Bab’Aziz: The Prince Who Contemplated His Soul by Nacer Khemir
A visual poem of incomparable beauty, this masterpiece from director Nacer Khemir (Wanderers of the Desert) begins with the story of a blind dervish named Bab’Aziz and his spirited granddaughter, Ishtar. Together they wander the desert in search of a great reunion of dervishes that takes place just once every thirty years. With faith as their only guide, the two journey for days through the expansive, barren landscape.

Nine Classics of Tunisian Cinema

Cinema has long held a pivotal role in the cultural life of Tunisia, often functioning as a tool to reflect on taboos and question social norms. The beginnings of Tunisian cinema date back to the 19th century when the Lumiere brothers shot scenes in the old alleys of Tunisia in the year 1896. For film enthusiasts and critics, Tunisian cinema has come to be known as provocative, daring, and experimental. Tunisian cinema has evolved over the years, with hundreds of movies produced since independence. Below is a collection of nine award-winning classics, the first article in an ongoing Tunisia Live series on Tunisian cinema.

Image: Bab’Aziz: The Prince Who Contemplated His Soul by Nacer Khemir

A visual poem of incomparable beauty, this masterpiece from director Nacer Khemir (Wanderers of the Desert) begins with the story of a blind dervish named Bab’Aziz and his spirited granddaughter, Ishtar. Together they wander the desert in search of a great reunion of dervishes that takes place just once every thirty years. With faith as their only guide, the two journey for days through the expansive, barren landscape.

Imams of the Valley by Shaykh Amin Buxton
THE VALLEY OF HADRAMAWT IS SITUATED IN YEMEN, in the south of the Arabian Peninsular. Since members of the blessed Prophetic household settled in the Valley in the fourth century of the Hijrah, it has been a centre of sacred knowledge and the attainment of spiritual perfection. In this remote valley, and particularly in its spiritual capital, Tarim, the Prophetic legacy was preserved and nurtured and then carried to the far corners of the earth. Beginning with the first of the descendants of the Prophet (saw) to settle in Hadramawt and looking down the centuries to recent times, “Imams of the Valley” examines the lives of a few of these illustrious figures. It is hoped that this book will enable the reader to increase in love for the family of the Messenger (saw) and for the pious, which is one of the foundations of Islam. 

Imams of the Valley by Shaykh Amin Buxton

THE VALLEY OF HADRAMAWT IS SITUATED IN YEMEN, in the south of the Arabian Peninsular. Since members of the blessed Prophetic household settled in the Valley in the fourth century of the Hijrah, it has been a centre of sacred knowledge and the attainment of spiritual perfection. In this remote valley, and particularly in its spiritual capital, Tarim, the Prophetic legacy was preserved and nurtured and then carried to the far corners of the earth. Beginning with the first of the descendants of the Prophet (saw) to settle in Hadramawt and looking down the centuries to recent times, “Imams of the Valley” examines the lives of a few of these illustrious figures. It is hoped that this book will enable the reader to increase in love for the family of the Messenger (saw) and for the pious, which is one of the foundations of Islam. 

Evidence Does Not Support Fears of Islam in the West
Why has a dichotomy persisted between Muslim and Western societies despite the bulk of academic research dispelling any notion of incompatibility? Director of the Islam in the West program at Harvard University Jocelyne Cesari explains
Are Muslims threatening the core values of the West? Jocelyne Cesari responds to this question by providing first-hand testimonies of Muslims in France, Germany, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and the United States. Her book is an unprecedented exploration of Muslims’ religious and political life based on several years of field work in Europe and in the United States.
Through a methodic investigation, she explains that Burqa, hijab, and minarets are threatening because Islam has become the external and internal Enemy of the West, especially since 9/11. Her book explains how Islam in the West has been connected to the War on Terror, how the presence of Islam in secular spaces has triggered a western politics of fear, exacerbated by the prominence of some intolerant Islamic interpretations of women, sexual minorities and non believers. The book’s unique, interdisciplinary scope allows for an in-depth analysis of data polls, surveys, political discourses, policy programs, interviews, and focus groups with Muslims. Ultimately, this book provides unique insights into the reality of Muslims in Europe and in the USA and unveils how western liberalism and secularism have been deeply transformed since 9/11.

Evidence Does Not Support Fears of Islam in the West

Why has a dichotomy persisted between Muslim and Western societies despite the bulk of academic research dispelling any notion of incompatibility? Director of the Islam in the West program at Harvard University Jocelyne Cesari explains

Are Muslims threatening the core values of the West? Jocelyne Cesari responds to this question by providing first-hand testimonies of Muslims in France, Germany, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and the United States. Her book is an unprecedented exploration of Muslims’ religious and political life based on several years of field work in Europe and in the United States.

Through a methodic investigation, she explains that Burqa, hijab, and minarets are threatening because Islam has become the external and internal Enemy of the West, especially since 9/11. Her book explains how Islam in the West has been connected to the War on Terror, how the presence of Islam in secular spaces has triggered a western politics of fear, exacerbated by the prominence of some intolerant Islamic interpretations of women, sexual minorities and non believers. The book’s unique, interdisciplinary scope allows for an in-depth analysis of data polls, surveys, political discourses, policy programs, interviews, and focus groups with Muslims. Ultimately, this book provides unique insights into the reality of Muslims in Europe and in the USA and unveils how western liberalism and secularism have been deeply transformed since 9/11.

We cannot say precisely when the musical penetration of East and West began, but one thing is certain: composers like Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert and others could not resist the fascination of the Orient. Thus elements of Turkish music, Persian poetry and Arabic storytelling found their way straight to the heart of European culture.

Islam in European Classical Music

Nadja Kayali is a composer and music journalist living in Vienna. 2010 saw the premiere in Osnabrück of her opera Neda, which was inspired by the medieval Persian poet Nizami, but also makes reference to the Iranian protest movement.