Posts tagged iraq

A reef complex in Iraqi waters discovered for the first time
Until now, it has been well-established that coral complex in the Arabian/Persian Gulf only exist in the coastal regions of Bahrain, Iran, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates and it was thought that there are no coral reefs in Iraq. However, here for the first time we show the existence of a living 28 km2 large coral reef in this country. These corals are adapted to one of the most extreme coral-bearing environments on earth: the seawater temperature in this area ranges between 14 and 34°C. The discovery of the unique coral reef oasis in the turbid coastal waters of Iraq will stimulate the interest of governmental agencies, environmental organizations, as well as of the international scientific community working on the fundamental understanding of coral marine ecosystems and global climate today.
Thomas Pohl, Sameh W. Al-Muqdadi, Malik H. Ali, Nadia Al-Mudaffar Fawzi, Hermann Ehrlich & Broder Merkel

A reef complex in Iraqi waters discovered for the first time

Until now, it has been well-established that coral complex in the Arabian/Persian Gulf only exist in the coastal regions of Bahrain, Iran, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates and it was thought that there are no coral reefs in Iraq. However, here for the first time we show the existence of a living 28 km2 large coral reef in this country. These corals are adapted to one of the most extreme coral-bearing environments on earth: the seawater temperature in this area ranges between 14 and 34°C. The discovery of the unique coral reef oasis in the turbid coastal waters of Iraq will stimulate the interest of governmental agencies, environmental organizations, as well as of the international scientific community working on the fundamental understanding of coral marine ecosystems and global climate today.

Thomas Pohl, Sameh W. Al-Muqdadi, Malik H. Ali, Nadia Al-Mudaffar Fawzi, Hermann Ehrlich & Broder Merkel

WELCOME TO IRAQ 
Opens 15 March 2014 Continues until 1 June 2014Main and First Floor Galleries,
The South London Gallery presents a restaging of the group exhibition, Welcome to Iraq, originally shown as part of the National Pavilion of Iraq in the 55th Venice Biennale in 2013.
This revelatory and highly-acclaimed show received widespread positive attention both from the visiting public and in the press when it was presented in Venice. Commissioned by Ruya Foundation for Contemporary Culture in Iraq (RUYA), established in 2012 to promote culture in Iraq, Welcome to Iraq was curated by Jonathan Watkins, Director of Ikon Gallery, Birmingham.

WELCOME TO IRAQ

Opens 15 March 2014 Continues until 1 June 2014
Main and First Floor Galleries,

The South London Gallery presents a restaging of the group exhibition, Welcome to Iraq, originally shown as part of the National Pavilion of Iraq in the 55th Venice Biennale in 2013.

This revelatory and highly-acclaimed show received widespread positive attention both from the visiting public and in the press when it was presented in Venice. Commissioned by Ruya Foundation for Contemporary Culture in Iraq (RUYA), established in 2012 to promote culture in Iraq, Welcome to Iraq was curated by Jonathan Watkins, Director of Ikon Gallery, Birmingham.

When the West invaded Iraq in 2003, Leilah Nadir was torn in two; both the occupier and the occupied flowed through her veins.
Born to an Iraqi father and an English mother, raised in Britain and Canada, she has never set foot on Iraqi soil. But she longs to visit the family home in central Baghdad, full of furniture, photographs and clothes, all guarded by her great-aunt, who waits for someone to return and reclaim it. While American helicopters fly low overhead and explosions shatter the calm, the date palms still sway in the heat of the day and jasmine scents Baghdad nights.
As invasion becomes occupation and lawlessness takes hold, Leilah’s relatives tell harrowing tales of car bombs and kidnappings. Her friend, award-winning photojournalist Farah Nosh, sends photos of Leilah’s family—along with stunning portraits of wounded Iraqis. After decades of averting his eyes from Iraq’s pain, Leilah’s father is forced to look back as well. Through his memories Leilah uncovers her family’s lost story, from the British mandate to the Gulf War to the American occupation.
And just as she gives up hope of ever meeting her family, a surprise reunion takes place.
"Far more even than the terrifying bare facts and statistics, this moving memoir, vividly evoking real people and their lives and homes, lets us understand why Iraqis feel that Americans destroyed their country." NOAM CHOMSKY 
“Leilah Nadir’s The Orange Trees of Baghdad reminds us that Iraq is not just a war; it is a country. Lovingly woven together from inherited memory and family lore, her Iraq is infinitely more vivid, more textured, and more heartbreaking than what we see nightly on the news. In the debates about winning and losing the war, this is a book about what loss really means—the theft of history and of homeland.”NAOMI KLEIN, author of No Logo and The Shock Doctrine
Book Launch:14 March (Friday); 7 p.m.The Big Green Bookshop, N22 6BG

When the West invaded Iraq in 2003, Leilah Nadir was torn in two; both the occupier and the occupied flowed through her veins.

Born to an Iraqi father and an English mother, raised in Britain and Canada, she has never set foot on Iraqi soil. But she longs to visit the family home in central Baghdad, full of furniture, photographs and clothes, all guarded by her great-aunt, who waits for someone to return and reclaim it. While American helicopters fly low overhead and explosions shatter the calm, the date palms still sway in the heat of the day and jasmine scents Baghdad nights.

As invasion becomes occupation and lawlessness takes hold, Leilah’s relatives tell harrowing tales of car bombs and kidnappings. Her friend, award-winning photojournalist Farah Nosh, sends photos of Leilah’s family—along with stunning portraits of wounded Iraqis. After decades of averting his eyes from Iraq’s pain, Leilah’s father is forced to look back as well. Through his memories Leilah uncovers her family’s lost story, from the British mandate to the Gulf War to the American occupation.

And just as she gives up hope of ever meeting her family, a surprise reunion takes place.

"Far more even than the terrifying bare facts and statistics, this moving memoir, vividly evoking real people and their lives and homes, lets us understand why Iraqis feel that Americans destroyed their country." NOAM CHOMSKY

“Leilah Nadir’s The Orange Trees of Baghdad reminds us that Iraq is not just a war; it is a country. Lovingly woven together from inherited memory and family lore, her Iraq is infinitely more vivid, more textured, and more heartbreaking than what we see nightly on the news. In the debates about winning and losing the war, this is a book about what loss really means—the theft of history and of homeland.”
NAOMI KLEIN, author of No Logo and The Shock Doctrine

Book Launch:
14 March (Friday); 7 p.m.
The Big Green Bookshop, N22 6BG

The Arab British Centre is proud to present an afternoon of poetry readings and discussion on the seventh anniversary of the bombing of Al Mutanabbi Street.

In March 2007, tragedy struck the heart and soul of Baghdad’s cultural and intellectual community. Al Mutanabbi Street was destroyed by a car bomb which killed over thirty people and wounded more than one hundred. The winding street filled with bookshops and outdoor stalls has for centuries been a meeting place for poets, political dissidents and literary aficionados, and is named after the famous 10th century classical Arab poet, Al-Mutanabbi.

DISHES FROM THE IRAQI COOKBOOK by LAMEES IBRAHIM
A cook’s tour that brings the richness of Mesopotamia’s culinary culture to the forefront The true richness of Iraqi culture has been hidden for many years, overshadowed by political conflict and war. Yet amid the destruction, Iraq’s culture–and not least its cuisine–has endured intact. The time has surely come to bring the richness of Mesopotamia’s culinary culture to the fore for the world to appreciate and enjoy. 
Dr Lamees Ibrahim was born in Baghdad, and now lives in London with her four grown up children. This is her first collection of recipes.

DISHES FROM THE IRAQI COOKBOOK by LAMEES IBRAHIM

A cook’s tour that brings the richness of Mesopotamia’s culinary culture to the forefront The true richness of Iraqi culture has been hidden for many years, overshadowed by political conflict and war. Yet amid the destruction, Iraq’s culture–and not least its cuisine–has endured intact. The time has surely come to bring the richness of Mesopotamia’s culinary culture to the fore for the world to appreciate and enjoy. 

Dr Lamees Ibrahim was born in Baghdad, and now lives in London with her four grown up children. This is her first collection of recipes.

"Our Children, Where To?", Iraqi artist Riad Nehmeh reminisces about his childhood, depicting memories both bitter and sweet

In the end people, and especially children, are the focal point of all my work, which revolves around humans and memory. I present panoramic artwork that is interconnected, with a child emerging in gradual shading from a foggy image. My intention is [to show] that children are thrust into an adult world and the wall creates a memory of the place where the child enters to inhabit this memory.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY NUMBERS STARTS TODAY

An exhibition of infographics on Iraq by Mona Chalabi

22 March 2013 11:00am - 28 March 2013 5:00pm
@ The Arab British Centre, 1 Gough Square, London EC4A 3DE

These images explore a story of progress in Iraq that has no easy beginning, middle or end. Each piece depicts a development statistic from a trusted source which is conveyed using a photo of the people that make up the numbers.

The 12 pieces use photography taken from trips to Iraq in 2012 and 2013 to interview Iraqis about their hopes for post-conflict stabilisation. Whether in Erbil, Najaf or Baghdad, the collective narrative Iraqis recounted was a complicated one. The past ten years have been marked by progression, recession and stagnation - development has been anything but linear.

Reel Iraq 2013 marks 10 years since the US and UK led military invasion, against which the world mobilised in solidarity with the people of Iraq. Reel Iraq will explore the contribution of art, culture and creativity to Iraqi life in a time of conflict, with over 50 events taking place in London, Edinburgh, Bristol, Glasgow, Dumfries, Leeds, Derry/Londonderry, Newcastle and Stirling.

Reel Iraq 2013 marks 10 years since the US and UK led military invasion, against which the world mobilised in solidarity with the people of Iraq. Reel Iraq will explore the contribution of art, culture and creativity to Iraqi life in a time of conflict, with over 50 events taking place in London, Edinburgh, Bristol, Glasgow, Dumfries, Leeds, Derry/Londonderry, Newcastle and Stirling.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY NUMBERS
An exhibition of infographics on Iraq by Mona Chalabi
22 - 28 March 2013 - The Arab British Centre
These images explore a story of progress in Iraq that has no easy beginning, middle or end. Each piece depicts a development statistic from a trusted source which is conveyed using a photo of the people that make up the numbers.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY NUMBERS

An exhibition of infographics on Iraq by Mona Chalabi

22 - 28 March 2013 - The Arab British Centre

These images explore a story of progress in Iraq that has no easy beginning, middle or end. Each piece depicts a development statistic from a trusted source which is conveyed using a photo of the people that make up the numbers.

We have fine and talented artists in the Arab world but circumstances are not in their favour. We reside in a spiritual part of the world and the soil of our region breathes culture. Culture is ingrained in us. Old Damascus is an accumulation of culture and civilisation throughout the ages. How do you expect artists not to emerge from this land? Our artists are committed to their humanitarian causes and those of their countries. They are mirrors of their societies.

Razan Chatti, a set designer and scenographer, is cultivating young talent under the auspices of the Afak (Horizons) foundation, which she launched in 2011.

Through Afak, she organises traveling exhibitions for artists from Lebanon, Syria and Iraq, whose works carry powerful humanitarian messages.

In My Mother’s Arms + Q&A Mohamed & Atia Al Daradji
Thursday 21st February, 2013 at 6:30pmThe Lexi Cinema London 
In a dangerous district in Baghdad Husham cares fiercely for a group of 32 young orphans, some whose parents have been killed, some who have run away, but all who have been abused and abandoned by the state.
When their landlord gives the group just two weeks to vacate the only house they have ever felt safe in a panicked search for new shelter ensues. Fighting tirelessly to continue to build on the boys’ hopes, dreams and prospects while also keeping them from being reclaimed by the state, Husham crosses religious and racial divides to find help.
IN MY MOTHER’S ARMS is the story of some of the Iraq war’s biggest victims, children, trying to live out the bittersweet dramas of childhood, against a far more threatening backdrop.

In My Mother’s Arms + Q&A Mohamed & Atia Al Daradji

Thursday 21st February, 2013 at 6:30pm
The Lexi Cinema London 

In a dangerous district in Baghdad Husham cares fiercely for a group of 32 young orphans, some whose parents have been killed, some who have run away, but all who have been abused and abandoned by the state.

When their landlord gives the group just two weeks to vacate the only house they have ever felt safe in a panicked search for new shelter ensues. Fighting tirelessly to continue to build on the boys’ hopes, dreams and prospects while also keeping them from being reclaimed by the state, Husham crosses religious and racial divides to find help.

IN MY MOTHER’S ARMS is the story of some of the Iraq war’s biggest victims, children, trying to live out the bittersweet dramas of childhood, against a far more threatening backdrop.

Samarra - Centre of the World101 Years of Archaeological Research on the Tigris
18 January - 26 May 2013  Pergamon Museum
Islamic Archaeology
Marking the 100th anniversary of excavations at the site, the Museum für Islamische Kunst (Museum of Islamic Art) presents an exhibition on the legendary royal city of Samarra, which lay approx. 120 km north of Bagdad on the banks of the Tigris, and which served as the government capital of the powerful Abbasid Caliphate from 836 to 892.
Samarra boasted one of most elaborate city plans in the world at the time. With its gigantic palaces, mosques, walled hunting parks, polo fields, and horse racing courses it stretched to an astonishing length of almost 50 km. Prominent ruins were excavated from 1911 to 1913 by the German archaeologist and Orientalist, Ernst Herzfeld. It was the first scientific excavation expressly dedicated to uncovering a site dating from the Islamic period. 
Today’s exhibition presents a large selection of the finds that made their way to the Berlin museums under the then prevailing antiquities law, by which the found objects were divided up, with half retained by the local country and half removed by the country responsible for financing and conducting the dig. 
Among the objects on display are wall paintings, stucco, and wood panelling, which once adorned the walls of palaces. Also on show are lusterware ceramics, Chinese porcelain, and cut glass: testaments of the city’s innovative artisanship and far-reaching trade links. The exhibition is enriched by a selection of historical excavation photographs taken by Ernst Herzfeld. They amount to important documents of the ruins, but also depict the landscape and everyday life at the dig.
(Photo Credit: Great Mosque of Samarra © Museum of Islamic Art, National Museums in Berlin Photo: Ernst Herzfeld, excavation photo 1911-13) - The Mosque of Samarra was the largest mosque in the world holding up to 100,000 people)

Samarra - Centre of the World
101 Years of Archaeological Research on the Tigris

18 January - 26 May 2013  Pergamon Museum

Islamic Archaeology

Marking the 100th anniversary of excavations at the site, the Museum für Islamische Kunst (Museum of Islamic Art) presents an exhibition on the legendary royal city of Samarra, which lay approx. 120 km north of Bagdad on the banks of the Tigris, and which served as the government capital of the powerful Abbasid Caliphate from 836 to 892.

Samarra boasted one of most elaborate city plans in the world at the time. With its gigantic palaces, mosques, walled hunting parks, polo fields, and horse racing courses it stretched to an astonishing length of almost 50 km. Prominent ruins were excavated from 1911 to 1913 by the German archaeologist and Orientalist, Ernst Herzfeld. It was the first scientific excavation expressly dedicated to uncovering a site dating from the Islamic period.

Today’s exhibition presents a large selection of the finds that made their way to the Berlin museums under the then prevailing antiquities law, by which the found objects were divided up, with half retained by the local country and half removed by the country responsible for financing and conducting the dig.

Among the objects on display are wall paintings, stucco, and wood panelling, which once adorned the walls of palaces. Also on show are lusterware ceramics, Chinese porcelain, and cut glass: testaments of the city’s innovative artisanship and far-reaching trade links. The exhibition is enriched by a selection of historical excavation photographs taken by Ernst Herzfeld. They amount to important documents of the ruins, but also depict the landscape and everyday life at the dig.

(Photo Credit: Great Mosque of Samarra © Museum of Islamic Art, National Museums in Berlin Photo: Ernst Herzfeld, excavation photo 1911-13) - The Mosque of Samarra was the largest mosque in the world holding up to 100,000 people)

The Virtual Museum of Iraq is a scientific and cultural initiative promoted by the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and realized by the Italian National Research Council.
The purpose of the project is to provide the public with the opportunity, through a web site, of coming into contact with the archaeological  historical and artistic heritage of one of the most important museum institutions in the world, the National Museum of Iraq, in Baghdad.
The museum, the foundation and development of which is linked to the historical and institutional events of Iraq itself, is home to an extraordinary collection of historical treasures. This collection grew and was extended thanks to the scientific surveys conducted by local and foreign archaeological teams starting in the 1920’s.
In 2003 the Baghdad Museum joined the sad list of world cultural sites destroyed or looted during wartime events. Thanks to the continuing efforts by local authorities and the international community, the activity of re-organization has been carry out and partially completed.

The Virtual Museum of Iraq is a scientific and cultural initiative promoted by the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and realized by the Italian National Research Council.

The purpose of the project is to provide the public with the opportunity, through a web site, of coming into contact with the archaeological  historical and artistic heritage of one of the most important museum institutions in the world, the National Museum of Iraq, in Baghdad.

The museum, the foundation and development of which is linked to the historical and institutional events of Iraq itself, is home to an extraordinary collection of historical treasures. This collection grew and was extended thanks to the scientific surveys conducted by local and foreign archaeological teams starting in the 1920’s.

In 2003 the Baghdad Museum joined the sad list of world cultural sites destroyed or looted during wartime events. Thanks to the continuing efforts by local authorities and the international community, the activity of re-organization has been carry out and partially completed.

INSIDE OUT project in Baghdad, IRAQ by JR

INSIDE OUT project in Baghdad, IRAQ by JR

HALIM AL KARIM: WITNESS FROM BAGHDAD 2013
Organisation: ARTSPACE LondonTime: 16 January 2013 10:00am - 23 February 2013 6:00pm Place: ARTSPACE London, 7 Milner Street London SW3 2QA
Halim Al Karim’s approach to his photography relies heavily on his attempt to understand his past; trying to comprehend what happened to him and his country. His own personal view of people and of the world depicted in his work can be symbolically enlarged to incorporate general and international interpretations.
(Image: Hidden Witnesses by Halim Al-Karim) 

HALIM AL KARIM: WITNESS FROM BAGHDAD 2013

Organisation: ARTSPACE London
Time: 16 January 2013 10:00am - 23 February 2013 6:00pm
Place: ARTSPACE London, 7 Milner Street London SW3 2QA

Halim Al Karim’s approach to his photography relies heavily on his attempt to understand his past; trying to comprehend what happened to him and his country. His own personal view of people and of the world depicted in his work can be symbolically enlarged to incorporate general and international interpretations.

(Image: Hidden Witnesses by Halim Al-Karim