Posts tagged art

Et pourtant ils créent ! (Syrie : la foi dans l’art) 

And yet they create! (Syria faith in the art)

The Institute of Islamic Cultures hosts the works of Syrian contemporary visual practices, expressions and varied writings that have in common the subsequent outbreak of the Syrian revolution. While some artists had to stop creating, others have welcomed into their works so often directly, sometimes obliquely, the violence in their country. Some even show their stubborn refusal to see the horizon of their creation reduced to war again, again and again.

ALWAN AL HAIA 
“[Say: “Our life is] the color of Allah! And who can color better than Allah? And it is He Whom we worship.” Al Baqarah 2:138
Painting by Dana Awartani, a half-Palestinian half-Saudi Arabian artist born and raised in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Through research and her own practice Dana was particularly drawn to the perennial philosophy to which geometry and all of the traditional arts subscribe. She found geometry to be representative of a timeless language of aesthetics which, through its mathematical and visually democratic origin represents a universal language of beauty and harmony; in essence, geometry is the perfect reflection of God’s infinity and manifestation on earth as found in nature and His creation. Geometry therefore combines artistic creativity with an inherent logical system informed by Divine principles.
Read an interview with her here. 
(Colours of LIfe: Shell gold & natural pigments on prepared paper 28.5 x 28.5 cm) 

ALWAN AL HAIA

“[Say: “Our life is] the color of Allah! And who can color better than Allah? And it is He Whom we worship.” Al Baqarah 2:138

Painting by Dana Awartani, a half-Palestinian half-Saudi Arabian artist born and raised in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Through research and her own practice Dana was particularly drawn to the perennial philosophy to which geometry and all of the traditional arts subscribe. She found geometry to be representative of a timeless language of aesthetics which, through its mathematical and visually democratic origin represents a universal language of beauty and harmony; in essence, geometry is the perfect reflection of God’s infinity and manifestation on earth as found in nature and His creation. Geometry therefore combines artistic creativity with an inherent logical system informed by Divine principles.

Read an interview with her here

(Colours of LIfe: Shell gold & natural pigments on prepared paper 28.5 x 28.5 cm) 

Banksy, Elbow and Idris Elba stand together with Syria in a moving video tribute

The campaign video marks the third anniversary of the conflict.

WELCOME TO IRAQ 
Opens 15 March 2014 Continues until 1 June 2014Main and First Floor Galleries,
The South London Gallery presents a restaging of the group exhibition, Welcome to Iraq, originally shown as part of the National Pavilion of Iraq in the 55th Venice Biennale in 2013.
This revelatory and highly-acclaimed show received widespread positive attention both from the visiting public and in the press when it was presented in Venice. Commissioned by Ruya Foundation for Contemporary Culture in Iraq (RUYA), established in 2012 to promote culture in Iraq, Welcome to Iraq was curated by Jonathan Watkins, Director of Ikon Gallery, Birmingham.

WELCOME TO IRAQ

Opens 15 March 2014 Continues until 1 June 2014
Main and First Floor Galleries,

The South London Gallery presents a restaging of the group exhibition, Welcome to Iraq, originally shown as part of the National Pavilion of Iraq in the 55th Venice Biennale in 2013.

This revelatory and highly-acclaimed show received widespread positive attention both from the visiting public and in the press when it was presented in Venice. Commissioned by Ruya Foundation for Contemporary Culture in Iraq (RUYA), established in 2012 to promote culture in Iraq, Welcome to Iraq was curated by Jonathan Watkins, Director of Ikon Gallery, Birmingham.

” MADE IN MOROCCO” , MOORHOUSE, 20/01/14 – 20/02/2014 
After a successful and busy year Moroccan Fine Art is pleased to announce their next exhibition in partnership with Moroccan Bazaar. Made in Morocco is presented at Art Moorhouse in London, from 20 January – 20 February 2014, offering a poetic and imaginative journey into the world of Moroccan culture.
Whilst we are familiar with Morocco as country we are in unfamiliar territory when it comes to Moroccan art. The kingdom has a long-standing tradition in decorative art, calligraphy, craft, music, and oral literature that serves and supports existing religious and social patterns. Made in Morocco explores its nation’s visual identity and cultural heritage by presenting the works of the country’s finest artists Mustapha Amnaine, Hassan Boukhari and Said Qodaid.

” MADE IN MOROCCO” , MOORHOUSE, 20/01/14 – 20/02/2014 

After a successful and busy year Moroccan Fine Art is pleased to announce their next exhibition in partnership with Moroccan Bazaar. Made in Morocco is presented at Art Moorhouse in London, from 20 January – 20 February 2014, offering a poetic and imaginative journey into the world of Moroccan culture.

Whilst we are familiar with Morocco as country we are in unfamiliar territory when it comes to Moroccan art. The kingdom has a long-standing tradition in decorative art, calligraphy, craft, music, and oral literature that serves and supports existing religious and social patterns. Made in Morocco explores its nation’s visual identity and cultural heritage by presenting the works of the country’s finest artists Mustapha Amnaine, Hassan Boukhari and Said Qodaid.

Jameel Prize 3

Dice Kayek has won the £25,000 Jameel Prize 3 for Istanbul Contrast, a collection of garments that evoke Istanbul’s architectural and artistic heritage. The judges felt that Dice Kayek’s work demonstrates how vibrant and creative Islamic traditions continue to be today. Their translation of architectural ideas into fashion shows how Islamic traditions can still transfer from one art form to another, as they did in the past. Ece and Ayşe Ege were presented with the prize by Martin Roth, Director of the V&A and Fady Jameel, President of Abdul Latif Jameel Community Initiatives (ALJCI) at an awards ceremony at the V&A on Tuesday 10 December.

(Image Credits: ‘Istanbul Contrast’, Dice Kayek, 2010/Jameel Prize 3 Exhibition view, © Victoria and Albert Museum, London )

Drone art: Death on a canvas

A generation of Pakistani artists focuses on expressing life under daily violence. 

Karachi, Pakistan - Violence is part of daily life in Pakistan, where TV stations regularly ambush viewers with news on the latest bombings, and where sirens and screeching ambulances are often heard racing through the streets after attacks. These things no longer surprise anyone, nor does the constant sight of flashing television bulletins reporting how many have died after the latest drone strike. This is not to say that Pakistan’s 192 million people are apathetic - but most have found ways to block out the violence. Yet some Pakistani artists have not been able to tune out the din of drone-strike deaths, and have instead chosen to address the issue head-on in their work. This art has urgency, a sense of purpose with specific intent: To be part of the dialogue on national identity and the future of the country. Al Jazeera spoke with four prominent artists whose work chronicles drone attacks and the effects of violence on the Pakistani psyche.

(Images: The Streets are Rising by Naiza Khan/In This Landscape There is No Certainty by Naiza Khan)

SYRI-ARTS: 101 WORKS OF ART 
Syri-Arts, organized by the NGO Kayany, a Lebanese non-profit organization, which is inviting artists to donate a work of art which will be exhibited and auctioned to raise funds for the Syrian children who are the first victims of the unbearable tragedy of the war in Syria. The response has been great, from the Middle East and beyond. Artists and galleries have responded with great enthusiasm to Syri-Arts’ invitation with an exquisite array of works.
(Image Credit: “Dreamland II, Upekkha series” by Nermine Hammam)

SYRI-ARTS: 101 WORKS OF ART

Syri-Arts, organized by the NGO Kayany, a Lebanese non-profit organization, which is inviting artists to donate a work of art which will be exhibited and auctioned to raise funds for the Syrian children who are the first victims of the unbearable tragedy of the war in Syria. The response has been great, from the Middle East and beyond. Artists and galleries have responded with great enthusiasm to Syri-Arts’ invitation with an exquisite array of works.

(Image Credit: “Dreamland II, Upekkha series” by Nermine Hammam)

CREATIVE DISSENT: ARTS OF THE ARAB WORLD UPRISINGS

This exhibit explores the visual arts and other expressive media of the recent Arab World Uprisings.

Images are often used as communicative devices to present politicized messages. During the recent Arab World uprisings, demonstrators created images to express opposition to incumbent governments and members of the ruling elite. Over and again, activists, protesters, artists, and other individuals adopted the expressive media—including videos, photographs, painted and digital images, as well as slogans, music, and even puppets—to create visualized and performed modes of dissent within public space, both in the streets and online.

Creative Dissent: Arts of the Arab World Uprisings will be on display at the Arab American National Museum, November 8, 2013 - February 9, 2014. Lower Level Gallery, free with Museum admission.

Nur: Light in Art and Science from the Islamic World
Nur: Light in Art and Science from the Islamic World, spanning more than ten centuries and including ancient artworks and objects from throughout the Islamic world. The exhibition will be on display in Seville from October before travelling to the Dallas Museum of Art (USA) in Spring 2014.
Featuring 150 objects from public and private collections in Europe, North Africa, the Middle East, and the United States, Nur: Light in Art and Science from the Islamic World explores the use and meaning of light in Islamic art and science, and demonstrates how light is a unifying motif in Islamic civilizations worldwide. The exhibition, directed and curated by Islamic art and culture expert Dr. Sabiha Al Khemir, includes numerous unprecedented objects that have never been displayed in public, from gold and silver inlaid metalwork through to anatomical illustrations.
The Nur: Light in Art and Science from the Islamic World exhibition will be housed at the Focus-Abengoa Foundation’s headquarters in the historic 17th century building, the Hospital de los Venerables Sacerdotes, from 25 October 2013 to 9 February 2014. It will subsequently travel to the United States and be on view at the Dallas Museum of Art in Texas, from 30 March 2014 to 29 June 2014. Deriving its title from the Arabic word for light in both the physical and metaphysical sense, 

Nur: Light in Art and Science from the Islamic World

Nur: Light in Art and Science from the Islamic World, spanning more than ten centuries and including ancient artworks and objects from throughout the Islamic world. The exhibition will be on display in Seville from October before travelling to the Dallas Museum of Art (USA) in Spring 2014.

Featuring 150 objects from public and private collections in Europe, North Africa, the Middle East, and the United States, Nur: Light in Art and Science from the Islamic World explores the use and meaning of light in Islamic art and science, and demonstrates how light is a unifying motif in Islamic civilizations worldwide. The exhibition, directed and curated by Islamic art and culture expert Dr. Sabiha Al Khemir, includes numerous unprecedented objects that have never been displayed in public, from gold and silver inlaid metalwork through to anatomical illustrations.

The Nur: Light in Art and Science from the Islamic World exhibition will be housed at the Focus-Abengoa Foundation’s headquarters in the historic 17th century building, the Hospital de los Venerables Sacerdotes, from 25 October 2013 to 9 February 2014. It will subsequently travel to the United States and be on view at the Dallas Museum of Art in Texas, from 30 March 2014 to 29 June 2014. Deriving its title from the Arabic word for light in both the physical and metaphysical sense, 

Meet Saudi Arabia’s leading artist, soldier, and ‘rock star’
Imagine a lieutenant-colonel in the Saudi Arabian army. Now imagine a conceptual artist from the same country. Put them together and you get Abdulnasser Gharem, who has his first big show in London.
Described by Rolling Stone magazine as the “rock star” of Saudi art, Abdulnasser Gharem has his first major solo show, perhaps not surprisingly, not in the Gulf state but in London at the Edge of Arabia gallery.
(Image: IN TRANSIT (I-II) From the Series Restored Behaviour Industrial lacquer paint on rubber stamps on 9mm plywood H160 x W200cm 2010)

Meet Saudi Arabia’s leading artist, soldier, and ‘rock star’

Imagine a lieutenant-colonel in the Saudi Arabian army. Now imagine a conceptual artist from the same country. Put them together and you get Abdulnasser Gharem, who has his first big show in London.

Described by Rolling Stone magazine as the “rock star” of Saudi art, Abdulnasser Gharem has his first major solo show, perhaps not surprisingly, not in the Gulf state but in London at the Edge of Arabia gallery.

(Image: IN TRANSIT (I-II) From the Series Restored Behaviour Industrial lacquer paint on rubber stamps on 9mm plywood H160 x W200cm 2010)

A very personal project started when artist Amani Alsaad began having a neurological problem. By viewing her personal MRI brain scans, she began to feel optimistic about her neurological problem, which disturbed her studies private life sometimes. She started planting roses inside her head and welcoming butterflies and adding quotes from the Holy Quran, about faith In predestination, being thankful, faithful and patient about things because they are predestined, and quoted from the holy Quran because in Islam we have (AlRuq’ya) Quran medication.
Her work is being shown as part of the Nour Festival at the Chelsea Theatre, 1 October to 30 November.
(Image: Taking care of the Roses by Amani Alsaad)

A very personal project started when artist Amani Alsaad began having a neurological problem. By viewing her personal MRI brain scans, she began to feel optimistic about her neurological problem, which disturbed her studies private life sometimes. She started planting roses inside her head and welcoming butterflies and adding quotes from the Holy Quran, about faith In predestination, being thankful, faithful and patient about things because they are predestined, and quoted from the holy Quran because in Islam we have (AlRuq’ya) Quran medication.

Her work is being shown as part of the Nour Festival at the Chelsea Theatre, 1 October to 30 November.

(Image: Taking care of the Roses by Amani Alsaad)

SYRIA: A SILENCED SCREAM
In the early, initially peaceful stages of the Syrian uprising, a group of activist artists named “The Syrian People Know Their Way” sought to disseminate powerful imagery, clever both visually and intellectually, protesting the regime of Bashar Al-Assad.
Their distinctive posters, produced collectively both inside and outside Syria via the Internet, challenge nearly 50 years of Ba’athist propaganda and allow viewers to examine the political reality of Syria through the perspective of the strugglers, rather than through the prism of the values of the Western world.
Making its U.S. debut, Syria: A Silenced Scream, reveals the struggle of the resistance artists who have since been silenced. The exhibition opens at a time when estimated 100,000 people have died in the Syrian conflict. Designed as an archive, the exhibition memorializes the movement for generations to come.
Presented by the Middle East Center for the Arts (MECA), in collaboration with the Research Gallery, Master’s Program of Integrated Design at the Holon Institute of Technology, on Mana Contemporary’s first floor. On view through Nov. 16, 2013.
(Image Arabic Text: “And a Human Will Be Born Among Us”)

SYRIA: A SILENCED SCREAM

In the early, initially peaceful stages of the Syrian uprising, a group of activist artists named “The Syrian People Know Their Way” sought to disseminate powerful imagery, clever both visually and intellectually, protesting the regime of Bashar Al-Assad.

Their distinctive posters, produced collectively both inside and outside Syria via the Internet, challenge nearly 50 years of Ba’athist propaganda and allow viewers to examine the political reality of Syria through the perspective of the strugglers, rather than through the prism of the values of the Western world.

Making its U.S. debut, Syria: A Silenced Scream, reveals the struggle of the resistance artists who have since been silenced. The exhibition opens at a time when estimated 100,000 people have died in the Syrian conflict. Designed as an archive, the exhibition memorializes the movement for generations to come.

Presented by the Middle East Center for the Arts (MECA), in collaboration with the Research Gallery, Master’s Program of Integrated Design at the Holon Institute of Technology, on Mana Contemporary’s first floor. On view through Nov. 16, 2013.

(Image Arabic Text: “And a Human Will Be Born Among Us”)

THE 13TH ISTANBUL BIENNIAL
Saturday, 14 September - Sunday, 20 October
The Istanbul Foundation for Culture and Arts (İKSV) organises the Istanbul Biennial, which aims to create a meeting point in İstanbul in the field of visual arts between artists from diverse cultures and the audience, for the 13th time this year.

THE 13TH ISTANBUL BIENNIAL

Saturday, 14 September - Sunday, 20 October

The Istanbul Foundation for Culture and Arts (İKSV) organises the Istanbul Biennial, which aims to create a meeting point in İstanbul in the field of visual arts between artists from diverse cultures and the audience, for the 13th time this year.

Syrian Civil War: Artists Displaced By Conflict Find Refuge (And Beauty) In Lebanese Artists’ Colony
ARA is a dynamic space for communication and creation. It is a collective community of eclectic forms of expression. We offer residency and commission artistic projects for young Syrian artists.
“With this war, Syria’s artists don’t have an emotional or physical place to work, so I offer them this,” said Raghad Mardini, a Syrian single mother of four and an accomplished civil engineer with a predilection for art. She renovated the stable in 2011 for this purpose, and runs the residency program for displaced and fleeing Syrian artists. So far she has hosted 24 artists, two at a time each month.
The Founder’s Vision
"The project arose out of my lifelong passion for a particular creative atmosphere I discovered years ago in the studios and ateliers of Damascus, an artistic eco-system which I lived and breathed and which produced so many of my favourite artists, many of them friends. The stables at Aley were a relic from the Civil War, which I found unloved like the walnut tree suffering sadly in the grounds.
As a civil engineer, I saw the opportunity to turn the stables into something beautiful and also symbolic: ruined and in trouble but still possessing an inner beauty it was impossible to mistake, and which the right amount of love and energy could revive into something productive and new. It’s a space of freedom and hope for every young Syrian artist.”
Raghad Mardini

Syrian Civil War: Artists Displaced By Conflict Find Refuge (And Beauty) In Lebanese Artists’ Colony

ARA is a dynamic space for communication and creation. It is a collective community of eclectic forms of expression. We offer residency and commission artistic projects for young Syrian artists.

“With this war, Syria’s artists don’t have an emotional or physical place to work, so I offer them this,” said Raghad Mardini, a Syrian single mother of four and an accomplished civil engineer with a predilection for art. She renovated the stable in 2011 for this purpose, and runs the residency program for displaced and fleeing Syrian artists. So far she has hosted 24 artists, two at a time each month.

The Founder’s Vision

"The project arose out of my lifelong passion for a particular creative atmosphere I discovered years ago in the studios and ateliers of Damascus, an artistic eco-system which I lived and breathed and which produced so many of my favourite artists, many of them friends. The stables at Aley were a relic from the Civil War, which I found unloved like the walnut tree suffering sadly in the grounds.

As a civil engineer, I saw the opportunity to turn the stables into something beautiful and also symbolic: ruined and in trouble but still possessing an inner beauty it was impossible to mistake, and which the right amount of love and energy could revive into something productive and new. It’s a space of freedom and hope for every young Syrian artist.”

Raghad Mardini