Posts tagged art

A forced-network visualisation of key players & notable relationships in the Middle East created by David McCandless & UniversLab. Part of the Knowledge is Beautiful project. Powered by VizSweet.

A forced-network visualisation of key players & notable relationships in the Middle East created by David McCandless & UniversLab. Part of the Knowledge is Beautiful project. Powered by VizSweet.

The New Museum presents “Here and Elsewhere,” a major exhibition of contemporary art from and about the Arab world
July 16–September 28, 2014
The exhibition brings together more than forty-five artists from over fifteen countries, many of whom live and work internationally. In keeping with the New Museum’s dedication to showcasing the most engaging new art from around the globe, “Here and Elsewhere” is the most recent in a series of exhibitions that have introduced urgent questions and new aesthetics to US audiences.
(Image Credit: Marwa Arsanios, Have You Ever Killed a Bear? Or Becoming Jamila, 2014 (still). Video, color, sound; 28 min. Courtesy the artist) 

The New Museum presents “Here and Elsewhere,” a major exhibition of contemporary art from and about the Arab world

July 16–September 28, 2014

The exhibition brings together more than forty-five artists from over fifteen countries, many of whom live and work internationally. In keeping with the New Museum’s dedication to showcasing the most engaging new art from around the globe, “Here and Elsewhere” is the most recent in a series of exhibitions that have introduced urgent questions and new aesthetics to US audiences.

(Image Credit: Marwa Arsanios, Have You Ever Killed a Bear? Or Becoming Jamila, 2014 (still). Video, color, sound; 28 min. Courtesy the artist) 

Syria’s Apex Generation 
9 June - 28 August (Dubai) | 11 June - 28 August (Beirut)
Syria’s Apex Generation explores the myriad ways artists are responding to the current conflict in Syria through multifaceted works that reflect a new phase of the country’s contemporary art. Focusing on painters who launched their careers in the 2000s when the Damascus art scene experienced significant growth, the exhibition will demonstrate how these artists have contributed to the catapulting of Syrian art over the past decade, which reached a high point just before the onset of the war. 
(Painting: Massacre (2012), Abdul Karim Majdal Al Beik. Image courtesy Ayyam Gallery)

Syria’s Apex Generation 

9 June - 28 August (Dubai) | 11 June - 28 August (Beirut)

Syria’s Apex Generation explores the myriad ways artists are responding to the current conflict in Syria through multifaceted works that reflect a new phase of the country’s contemporary art. Focusing on painters who launched their careers in the 2000s when the Damascus art scene experienced significant growth, the exhibition will demonstrate how these artists have contributed to the catapulting of Syrian art over the past decade, which reached a high point just before the onset of the war. 

(Painting: Massacre (2012), Abdul Karim Majdal Al Beik. Image courtesy Ayyam Gallery)

Behind the headlines A revolution in Syrian art

Behind the headlines is a series of events at the Museum exploring the cultural context behind news stories from across the world, looking closely at objects from the Museum’s collection.

Before 2011, the Syrian art scene was limited by the number of galleries and spaces for showing work, and the government control of cultural institutions. Since the uprising, an outpouring of creative expression from artists across all levels of Syrian society has formed a response to the violence. This panel discussion, chaired by Malu Halasa, co-editor of Syria Speaks: Art and Culture from the Frontline, and including panellists Issam Kourbaj, Zaher Omareen, Khalil Younes and Venetia Porter, will consider the pre-revolution period through looking at British Museum objects, the change that revolution has bought to the country’s artists, and the new possibilities that lie ahead.

The British Museum
Friday 20 June
18.30–19.30 
BP Lecture Theatre

Syria Speaks
Art and Culture from the Frontline
Edited by Malu Halasa, Zaher Omareen and Nawara Mahfoud
In Syria, culture has become a critical line of defence against tyranny.
Syria Speaks is a celebration of a people determined to reclaim their dignity, freedom and self-expression. It showcases the work of over fifty artists and writers who are challenging the culture of violence in Syria. Their literature, poems and songs, cartoons, political posters and photographs document and interpret the momentous changes that have shifted the frame of reality so drastically in Syria.
Moving and inspiring, Syria Speaks is testament to the courage, creativity and imagination of the Syrian people.
(Cover image: Poster by Alshaab alsori aref tarekh showing a character by Mohamed Tayeb. Zaytoun, the Little Refugee, from the Yarmouk Palestinian camp in Damascus, is a political, artistic and educational project, which contests the monopoly of power to write history)
Published: June 2014

Syria Speaks

Art and Culture from the Frontline

Edited by Malu Halasa, Zaher Omareen and Nawara Mahfoud

In Syria, culture has become a critical line of defence against tyranny.

Syria Speaks is a celebration of a people determined to reclaim their dignity, freedom and self-expression. It showcases the work of over fifty artists and writers who are challenging the culture of violence in Syria. Their literature, poems and songs, cartoons, political posters and photographs document and interpret the momentous changes that have shifted the frame of reality so drastically in Syria.

Moving and inspiring, Syria Speaks is testament to the courage, creativity and imagination of the Syrian people.

(Cover image: Poster by Alshaab alsori aref tarekh showing a character by Mohamed Tayeb. Zaytoun, the Little Refugee, from the Yarmouk Palestinian camp in Damascus, is a political, artistic and educational project, which contests the monopoly of power to write history)

Published: June 2014

"…you would be be squelching around with blood on the floor…"
The artist Bob and Roberta Smith was inspired to produce this art work after listening to Dr David Nott in an interview on BBC Radio 4’s PM show. In the interview Dr David Nott talks about his experience working as a surgeon in war torn Syria.
The art piece is on display at the Royal Academy of Arts Summer Exhibition 2014 from 9 June to 17 August. 
You can listen to the inspiring interview here.
(Image Credit: BBCPM)

"…you would be be squelching around with blood on the floor…"

The artist Bob and Roberta Smith was inspired to produce this art work after listening to Dr David Nott in an interview on BBC Radio 4’s PM show. In the interview Dr David Nott talks about his experience working as a surgeon in war torn Syria.

The art piece is on display at the Royal Academy of Arts Summer Exhibition 2014 from 9 June to 17 August. 

You can listen to the inspiring interview here.

(Image Credit: BBCPM)

Et pourtant ils créent ! (Syrie : la foi dans l’art) 

And yet they create! (Syria faith in the art)

The Institute of Islamic Cultures hosts the works of Syrian contemporary visual practices, expressions and varied writings that have in common the subsequent outbreak of the Syrian revolution. While some artists had to stop creating, others have welcomed into their works so often directly, sometimes obliquely, the violence in their country. Some even show their stubborn refusal to see the horizon of their creation reduced to war again, again and again.

ALWAN AL HAIA 
“[Say: “Our life is] the color of Allah! And who can color better than Allah? And it is He Whom we worship.” Al Baqarah 2:138
Painting by Dana Awartani, a half-Palestinian half-Saudi Arabian artist born and raised in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Through research and her own practice Dana was particularly drawn to the perennial philosophy to which geometry and all of the traditional arts subscribe. She found geometry to be representative of a timeless language of aesthetics which, through its mathematical and visually democratic origin represents a universal language of beauty and harmony; in essence, geometry is the perfect reflection of God’s infinity and manifestation on earth as found in nature and His creation. Geometry therefore combines artistic creativity with an inherent logical system informed by Divine principles.
Read an interview with her here. 
(Colours of LIfe: Shell gold & natural pigments on prepared paper 28.5 x 28.5 cm) 

ALWAN AL HAIA

“[Say: “Our life is] the color of Allah! And who can color better than Allah? And it is He Whom we worship.” Al Baqarah 2:138

Painting by Dana Awartani, a half-Palestinian half-Saudi Arabian artist born and raised in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Through research and her own practice Dana was particularly drawn to the perennial philosophy to which geometry and all of the traditional arts subscribe. She found geometry to be representative of a timeless language of aesthetics which, through its mathematical and visually democratic origin represents a universal language of beauty and harmony; in essence, geometry is the perfect reflection of God’s infinity and manifestation on earth as found in nature and His creation. Geometry therefore combines artistic creativity with an inherent logical system informed by Divine principles.

Read an interview with her here

(Colours of LIfe: Shell gold & natural pigments on prepared paper 28.5 x 28.5 cm) 

Banksy, Elbow and Idris Elba stand together with Syria in a moving video tribute

The campaign video marks the third anniversary of the conflict.

WELCOME TO IRAQ 
Opens 15 March 2014 Continues until 1 June 2014Main and First Floor Galleries,
The South London Gallery presents a restaging of the group exhibition, Welcome to Iraq, originally shown as part of the National Pavilion of Iraq in the 55th Venice Biennale in 2013.
This revelatory and highly-acclaimed show received widespread positive attention both from the visiting public and in the press when it was presented in Venice. Commissioned by Ruya Foundation for Contemporary Culture in Iraq (RUYA), established in 2012 to promote culture in Iraq, Welcome to Iraq was curated by Jonathan Watkins, Director of Ikon Gallery, Birmingham.

WELCOME TO IRAQ

Opens 15 March 2014 Continues until 1 June 2014
Main and First Floor Galleries,

The South London Gallery presents a restaging of the group exhibition, Welcome to Iraq, originally shown as part of the National Pavilion of Iraq in the 55th Venice Biennale in 2013.

This revelatory and highly-acclaimed show received widespread positive attention both from the visiting public and in the press when it was presented in Venice. Commissioned by Ruya Foundation for Contemporary Culture in Iraq (RUYA), established in 2012 to promote culture in Iraq, Welcome to Iraq was curated by Jonathan Watkins, Director of Ikon Gallery, Birmingham.

” MADE IN MOROCCO” , MOORHOUSE, 20/01/14 – 20/02/2014 
After a successful and busy year Moroccan Fine Art is pleased to announce their next exhibition in partnership with Moroccan Bazaar. Made in Morocco is presented at Art Moorhouse in London, from 20 January – 20 February 2014, offering a poetic and imaginative journey into the world of Moroccan culture.
Whilst we are familiar with Morocco as country we are in unfamiliar territory when it comes to Moroccan art. The kingdom has a long-standing tradition in decorative art, calligraphy, craft, music, and oral literature that serves and supports existing religious and social patterns. Made in Morocco explores its nation’s visual identity and cultural heritage by presenting the works of the country’s finest artists Mustapha Amnaine, Hassan Boukhari and Said Qodaid.

” MADE IN MOROCCO” , MOORHOUSE, 20/01/14 – 20/02/2014 

After a successful and busy year Moroccan Fine Art is pleased to announce their next exhibition in partnership with Moroccan Bazaar. Made in Morocco is presented at Art Moorhouse in London, from 20 January – 20 February 2014, offering a poetic and imaginative journey into the world of Moroccan culture.

Whilst we are familiar with Morocco as country we are in unfamiliar territory when it comes to Moroccan art. The kingdom has a long-standing tradition in decorative art, calligraphy, craft, music, and oral literature that serves and supports existing religious and social patterns. Made in Morocco explores its nation’s visual identity and cultural heritage by presenting the works of the country’s finest artists Mustapha Amnaine, Hassan Boukhari and Said Qodaid.

Jameel Prize 3

Dice Kayek has won the £25,000 Jameel Prize 3 for Istanbul Contrast, a collection of garments that evoke Istanbul’s architectural and artistic heritage. The judges felt that Dice Kayek’s work demonstrates how vibrant and creative Islamic traditions continue to be today. Their translation of architectural ideas into fashion shows how Islamic traditions can still transfer from one art form to another, as they did in the past. Ece and Ayşe Ege were presented with the prize by Martin Roth, Director of the V&A and Fady Jameel, President of Abdul Latif Jameel Community Initiatives (ALJCI) at an awards ceremony at the V&A on Tuesday 10 December.

(Image Credits: ‘Istanbul Contrast’, Dice Kayek, 2010/Jameel Prize 3 Exhibition view, © Victoria and Albert Museum, London )

Drone art: Death on a canvas

A generation of Pakistani artists focuses on expressing life under daily violence. 

Karachi, Pakistan - Violence is part of daily life in Pakistan, where TV stations regularly ambush viewers with news on the latest bombings, and where sirens and screeching ambulances are often heard racing through the streets after attacks. These things no longer surprise anyone, nor does the constant sight of flashing television bulletins reporting how many have died after the latest drone strike. This is not to say that Pakistan’s 192 million people are apathetic - but most have found ways to block out the violence. Yet some Pakistani artists have not been able to tune out the din of drone-strike deaths, and have instead chosen to address the issue head-on in their work. This art has urgency, a sense of purpose with specific intent: To be part of the dialogue on national identity and the future of the country. Al Jazeera spoke with four prominent artists whose work chronicles drone attacks and the effects of violence on the Pakistani psyche.

(Images: The Streets are Rising by Naiza Khan/In This Landscape There is No Certainty by Naiza Khan)

SYRI-ARTS: 101 WORKS OF ART 
Syri-Arts, organized by the NGO Kayany, a Lebanese non-profit organization, which is inviting artists to donate a work of art which will be exhibited and auctioned to raise funds for the Syrian children who are the first victims of the unbearable tragedy of the war in Syria. The response has been great, from the Middle East and beyond. Artists and galleries have responded with great enthusiasm to Syri-Arts’ invitation with an exquisite array of works.
(Image Credit: “Dreamland II, Upekkha series” by Nermine Hammam)

SYRI-ARTS: 101 WORKS OF ART

Syri-Arts, organized by the NGO Kayany, a Lebanese non-profit organization, which is inviting artists to donate a work of art which will be exhibited and auctioned to raise funds for the Syrian children who are the first victims of the unbearable tragedy of the war in Syria. The response has been great, from the Middle East and beyond. Artists and galleries have responded with great enthusiasm to Syri-Arts’ invitation with an exquisite array of works.

(Image Credit: “Dreamland II, Upekkha series” by Nermine Hammam)

CREATIVE DISSENT: ARTS OF THE ARAB WORLD UPRISINGS

This exhibit explores the visual arts and other expressive media of the recent Arab World Uprisings.

Images are often used as communicative devices to present politicized messages. During the recent Arab World uprisings, demonstrators created images to express opposition to incumbent governments and members of the ruling elite. Over and again, activists, protesters, artists, and other individuals adopted the expressive media—including videos, photographs, painted and digital images, as well as slogans, music, and even puppets—to create visualized and performed modes of dissent within public space, both in the streets and online.

Creative Dissent: Arts of the Arab World Uprisings will be on display at the Arab American National Museum, November 8, 2013 - February 9, 2014. Lower Level Gallery, free with Museum admission.