Posts tagged Yemen

Book Launch at SOAS: These 13 stories of young activists from the MENA region (Bahrain, Egypt, Libya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria, Jordan, Yemen, Palestine - West bank & Gaza), reveal how young Arab women and men, who come from very diverse backgrounds, regions, continents, share the same passion for their countries, the same audacity of hope for a better tomorrow, the same dream of making their country proud of them. All of the writers who were committed to this project were deeply convinced that one should not ask what their country will do for them, but rather what could they offer their countries. In a world where barriers are constantly being erased, where virtual communication turns the world to a global village, what is this strange bond that ties this Arab youth to politics and public affairs?

Book Launch at SOAS: These 13 stories of young activists from the MENA region (Bahrain, Egypt, Libya, Kuwait, Lebanon, Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria, Jordan, Yemen, Palestine - West bank & Gaza), reveal how young Arab women and men, who come from very diverse backgrounds, regions, continents, share the same passion for their countries, the same audacity of hope for a better tomorrow, the same dream of making their country proud of them. All of the writers who were committed to this project were deeply convinced that one should not ask what their country will do for them, but rather what could they offer their countries. In a world where barriers are constantly being erased, where virtual communication turns the world to a global village, what is this strange bond that ties this Arab youth to politics and public affairs?

QAT, COFFEE & QAMBUS: RAW 45s FROM YEMEN
Compiled by Chris Menist, Qat, Coffee & Qambus: Raw 45s from Yemen features vintage oud and vocal music inspired by the qat-chewing, coffee-sipping, qambus-playing culture of Yemen. Although part of the classical Arabic musical tradition, the music of Yemen takes its rhythmic lead as much from the East African coast (a mere 20 miles across the Red Sea) as the surrounding Arab Peninsula. Little has been written about the music and culture of one of the world’s oldest civilizations, and each 45rpm disc gives a small glimpse of the poetic tradition, the unique local oud styles as well as an insight into people’s day-to-day lives, or the highs and lows of human relationships. Overall, the compilation gives a flavor of the sights and sounds of Yemen, with detailed notes that tell the story of the hunt for music that has mostly lain forgotten in the antique markets of the capital, until now.

QAT, COFFEE & QAMBUS: RAW 45s FROM YEMEN

Compiled by Chris Menist, Qat, Coffee & Qambus: Raw 45s from Yemen features vintage oud and vocal music inspired by the qat-chewing, coffee-sipping, qambus-playing culture of Yemen. Although part of the classical Arabic musical tradition, the music of Yemen takes its rhythmic lead as much from the East African coast (a mere 20 miles across the Red Sea) as the surrounding Arab Peninsula.

Little has been written about the music and culture of one of the world’s oldest civilizations, and each 45rpm disc gives a small glimpse of the poetic tradition, the unique local oud styles as well as an insight into people’s day-to-day lives, or the highs and lows of human relationships. Overall, the compilation gives a flavor of the sights and sounds of Yemen, with detailed notes that tell the story of the hunt for music that has mostly lain forgotten in the antique markets of the capital, until now.

TEDxSanaa was the first TEDx event in Yemen. It aims at exposing the talent, creativity, and ingenuity of Yemenis. The event brought the brightest, the most creative, and most influential Yemenis together to inspire and remind the world of the potential that Yemen has to be a good world citizen. It comes in a very critical time when Yemen, which is one of the Arab Spring countries, entered a transitional phase towards becoming a democratic, modern state. The Slogan of TEDxSanaa 2012 is “Inspiring Hope” and took place on Dec, 31st 2012.
Original Content by TEDxSanaa with some editing by ihya

TEDxSanaa was the first TEDx event in Yemen. It aims at exposing the talent, creativity, and ingenuity of Yemenis. The event brought the brightest, the most creative, and most influential Yemenis together to inspire and remind the world of the potential that Yemen has to be a good world citizen. It comes in a very critical time when Yemen, which is one of the Arab Spring countries, entered a transitional phase towards becoming a democratic, modern state. The Slogan of TEDxSanaa 2012 is “Inspiring Hope” and took place on Dec, 31st 2012.

Original Content by TEDxSanaa with some editing by ihya

A collection of videos from Muslim women around the world speaking about the challenges facing humankind in preparation for tomorrow’s historic conference in Tunisia. 

(Video: Interview with one of the Women of Hizb ut-Tahrir in Yemen)

US policymakers hope they can control the Arab Revolution 
The Center for a New American Security (CNAS), a US think tank is hosting a book launch for “The Arab Uprising: The Unfinished Revolutions of the New Middle East” by Dr. Marc Lynch. US policymakers hope they can control the Arab Revolution and shape the nature of change according to US interests.   

In The Arab Uprising, Dr. Lynch examines the emerging regional landscape in the Middle East, one in which, he argues, the old heavyweights - Iran, al Qaeda, even Israel - have all been disempowered, and nations like Saudi Arabia are powering a new cold war. Dr. Lynch highlights the new fault lines that are forming between forces of revolution and counter-revolution and shows what it all means for the future of U.S. foreign policy. Deeply informed by inside access to the Obama administration’s decisionmaking process and first-hand interviews with protestors, politicians, diplomats and journalists, The Arab Uprising is an unprecedented and indispensible guide to the changing lay of the land in the Middle East and North Africa.

US policymakers hope they can control the Arab Revolution

The Center for a New American Security (CNAS), a US think tank is hosting a book launch for “The Arab Uprising: The Unfinished Revolutions of the New Middle East” by Dr. Marc Lynch. US policymakers hope they can control the Arab Revolution and shape the nature of change according to US interests.   

In The Arab Uprising, Dr. Lynch examines the emerging regional landscape in the Middle East, one in which, he argues, the old heavyweights - Iran, al Qaeda, even Israel - have all been disempowered, and nations like Saudi Arabia are powering a new cold war. Dr. Lynch highlights the new fault lines that are forming between forces of revolution and counter-revolution and shows what it all means for the future of U.S. foreign policy. Deeply informed by inside access to the Obama administration’s decisionmaking process and first-hand interviews with protestors, politicians, diplomats and journalists, The Arab Uprising is an unprecedented and indispensible guide to the changing lay of the land in the Middle East and North Africa.

Global Art Uprising 
Inspired by a Year of Revolutionary Protests, Artists Across the World Seek to Occupy the Public Imagination
(Photo Credit: Gigi Ibrahim/Flickr - “Tantawi is Mubarak” reads this street portrait from Cairo)

Global Art Uprising

Inspired by a Year of Revolutionary Protests, Artists Across the World Seek to Occupy the Public Imagination

(Photo Credit: Gigi Ibrahim/Flickr - “Tantawi is Mubarak” reads this street portrait from Cairo)

The Arab Spring, another development of historic importance, might portend at least a partial “loss” of MENA. The US and its allies have tried hard to prevent that outcome — so far, with considerable success. Their policy towards the popular uprisings has kept closely to the standard guidelines: support the forces most amenable to U.S. influence and control. Favored dictators are supported as long as they can maintain control (as in the major oil states). When that is no longer possible, then discard them and try to restore the old regime as fully as possible (as in Tunisia and Egypt).

The Imperial Way: American Decline in Perspective, Part 2

by Noam Chomsky, Institute Professor emeritus in the MIT Department of Linguistics and Philosophy.

The Khilafah: A bright Model for Women’s Rights and Political Role
Much has been written about the role of women in the Arab Awakening, and many stereotypes have been perpetuated by the media about women in Islam. This conference in Tunisia is a clear indication that women in the Arab and Muslim world are no longer going to be subject to stereotypes or oppression. 

Women of Hizb ut-Tahrir from across the world have launched a global campaign entitled, “The Khilafah : A bright Model for Women’s Rights and Political Role”” that will culminate in a truly historic International Women’s Conference in Tunisia on the 10th of March, the week of International Women’s Day. The conference will gather female opinion makers from across the Muslim world and beyond to present a detailed vision of what the Khilafah ruling system based purely upon Islamic laws and principles would mean to the status, rights, and lives of women. Both the campaign and conference aim to explain how the Khilafah holds credible, viable, and practical solutions to the multitude of political, economic, and social problems afflicting women across the Muslim world. It will also challenge the worn-out narrative of women’s oppression under Islamic rule.
"From Tunisia, a place that was once a bastion of secularism in the Muslim world and hailed as a model for women’s rights by many in the West, the women of Hizb ut-Tahrir will aim to show that it is the Islamic system of governance that can bring true liberation to the region’s women."

The Khilafah: A bright Model for Women’s Rights and Political Role

Much has been written about the role of women in the Arab Awakening, and many stereotypes have been perpetuated by the media about women in Islam. This conference in Tunisia is a clear indication that women in the Arab and Muslim world are no longer going to be subject to stereotypes or oppression. 

Women of Hizb ut-Tahrir from across the world have launched a global campaign entitled, “The Khilafah : A bright Model for Women’s Rights and Political Role”” that will culminate in a truly historic International Women’s Conference in Tunisia on the 10th of March, the week of International Women’s Day. The conference will gather female opinion makers from across the Muslim world and beyond to present a detailed vision of what the Khilafah ruling system based purely upon Islamic laws and principles would mean to the status, rights, and lives of women. Both the campaign and conference aim to explain how the Khilafah holds credible, viable, and practical solutions to the multitude of political, economic, and social problems afflicting women across the Muslim world. It will also challenge the worn-out narrative of women’s oppression under Islamic rule.

"From Tunisia, a place that was once a bastion of secularism in the Muslim world and hailed as a model for women’s rights by many in the West, the women of Hizb ut-Tahrir will aim to show that it is the Islamic system of governance that can bring true liberation to the region’s women."

ARAB YOUTHSocial Mobilization in Times of Risk EDITED BY SAMIR KHALAF, ROSEANNE SAAD KHALAF
In 2011, thousands of Arab youth took to the streets to demand their freedom. Although it is too early to speculate on the ultimate outcome of the revolutionary uprisings, one auspicious feature stands out: they reveal the genesis of a new generation sparked by the desire for civil liberties, advocacy for human rights and participatory democracy.
Arab Youth explores some of the antecedents of the upheavals and anticipates alternative venues of resistance that marginalized youth, from Lebanon, Syria and Palestine to Saudi Arabia, Morocco and Iran, can mobilize to realize their emancipatory expectations. Themes covered in this unique volume include the forging of meaningful collective identities in times of risk and uncertainty; youth militancy, neighborhood violence and youth gangs in distinct urban and suburban settings; the surge of youthful activism in political movements, advocacy groups and welfare civic associations; and youths’ expressive outlets through popular arts, street music and popular culture.

ARAB YOUTH
Social Mobilization in Times of Risk
EDITED BY SAMIR KHALAF, ROSEANNE SAAD KHALAF

In 2011, thousands of Arab youth took to the streets to demand their freedom. Although it is too early to speculate on the ultimate outcome of the revolutionary uprisings, one auspicious feature stands out: they reveal the genesis of a new generation sparked by the desire for civil liberties, advocacy for human rights and participatory democracy.

Arab Youth explores some of the antecedents of the upheavals and anticipates alternative venues of resistance that marginalized youth, from Lebanon, Syria and Palestine to Saudi Arabia, Morocco and Iran, can mobilize to realize their emancipatory expectations. Themes covered in this unique volume include the forging of meaningful collective identities in times of risk and uncertainty; youth militancy, neighborhood violence and youth gangs in distinct urban and suburban settings; the surge of youthful activism in political movements, advocacy groups and welfare civic associations; and youths’ expressive outlets through popular arts, street music and popular culture.

Samuel Aranda for The New York Times Wins the Top World Press Photo prize 2011
Samuel Aranda’s photograph of a woman holding a wounded relative in her arms was a poignant image of the Arab Awakening. The photograph was taken in Yemen, inside a mosque, which was being used as a field hospital by demonstrators. Aidan Sullivan who was the chair of the judging panel said:

We might never know who this woman is, cradling an injured relative, but together they become a living image of the courage of ordinary people that helped create an important chapter in the history of the Middle East.

(Photo Credit: Samuel Aranda)

Samuel Aranda for The New York Times Wins the Top World Press Photo prize 2011

Samuel Aranda’s photograph of a woman holding a wounded relative in her arms was a poignant image of the Arab Awakening. The photograph was taken in Yemen, inside a mosque, which was being used as a field hospital by demonstrators. Aidan Sullivan who was the chair of the judging panel said:

We might never know who this woman is, cradling an injured relative, but together they become a living image of the courage of ordinary people that helped create an important chapter in the history of the Middle East.

(Photo Credit: Samuel Aranda)

Revolution vs Revolution
The Beirut Art Center hosts an exhibition about revolutions over the last 50 years in light of the Arab Awakening. 

The choice not to include any works dealing with the actual situation in the Arab world was deliberate, as the narrative is still in progress in our region. 
The aim of the exhibition is not to be an exhaustive survey of historical events, but to reflect on radical movements and transformations, the context in which they have taken place, as well as their legacy, and more specifically, their resonance in our region today…The title of the exhibition, Revolution vs Revolution, suggests the idea that revolution often leads to other revolutions, either in confrontation with previously established systems, or by inspiring similar changes across time and across borders.

(Photo: Tacita Dean - From the series Czech Photos)

Revolution vs Revolution

The Beirut Art Center hosts an exhibition about revolutions over the last 50 years in light of the Arab Awakening. 

The choice not to include any works dealing with the actual situation in the Arab world was deliberate, as the narrative is still in progress in our region. 
The aim of the exhibition is not to be an exhaustive survey of historical events, but to reflect on radical movements and transformations, the context in which they have taken place, as well as their legacy, and more specifically, their resonance in our region today…The title of the exhibition, Revolution vs Revolution, suggests the idea that revolution often leads to other revolutions, either in confrontation with previously established systems, or by inspiring similar changes across time and across borders.

(Photo: Tacita Dean - From the series Czech Photos)

Revolution Paintings: Graffiti and Arab Public Places
An exhibition at the Casa Árabe in Madrid shows work by graffiti artists and anonymous citizens expressing their revolutionary spirit in painting, banners and murals. Work is shown from cities in Egypt, Libya, Yemen and Tunisia.

Noticeably, no work from Syria appears in the exhibition. To reflect the inability of Casa Árabe’s sources to document graffiti in a country sliding closer toward what many fear will be a civil war, one wall remains blank, with “Space reserved for graffiti from Syria” written in black.

Revolution Paintings: Graffiti and Arab Public Places

An exhibition at the Casa Árabe in Madrid shows work by graffiti artists and anonymous citizens expressing their revolutionary spirit in painting, banners and murals. Work is shown from cities in Egypt, Libya, Yemen and Tunisia.

Noticeably, no work from Syria appears in the exhibition. To reflect the inability of Casa Árabe’s sources to document graffiti in a country sliding closer toward what many fear will be a civil war, one wall remains blank, with “Space reserved for graffiti from Syria” written in black.

The Invisible Arab traces the roots of the revolutions in the Arab world. Marwan Bishara, chief policy analyst of Al Jazeera English and the anchor of the program “Empire”, combines on-the-ground reporting, extensive research and scholarship, and political commentary in this book on the complex influences that made the revolutions possible.

The Invisible Arab traces the roots of the revolutions in the Arab world. Marwan Bishara, chief policy analyst of Al Jazeera English and the anchor of the program “Empire”, combines on-the-ground reporting, extensive research and scholarship, and political commentary in this book on the complex influences that made the revolutions possible.

The Invisible Arab - The Promise and Peril of the Arab Revolutions by Marwan Bishara

Reading excerpts from Marwan’s book, it is striking that he does not see the root of the problems in the Arab world to be deeply intellectual, but rather sees the problems as structural, and misuse of political power. Such an analysis would be most welcomed if it were true because then the problems afflicting the Arab world could be easily solved. The book however is an important contribution to the debate about the future of the Arab world. One hopes that this debate will be wide, deep and inclusive because transformation of the Arab world can only happen when the Arab world has built its transformation upon a profound understanding of human advancement.

It’s my contention that the roots of Arab problems are not civilisational, economic, philosophical, or theological per se, even if religion, development, and culture have had great influence on the Arab reality. The origins of the miserable Arab reality are political par excellence. Like capital to capitalism, or individualism to liberalism, the use and misuse of political power has been the factor that defines the contemporary Arab state. Arab regimes have subjugated or transformed all facets of Arab society.

Where next for Arab science? Q&A with Jordan’s Princess Sumaya

How has the Arab Spring provided opportunities for science and technology?

A large part of it is people starting to think in terms of meritocracy. A huge potential of talent has been unleashed — talent that was previously held back by corruption and by cronyism, and by a disregard for meritocratic progress. This is when we can start talking about the Arab Spring becoming the Arab Summer — when we see people assessed on, and acknowledged for what they are able to contribute. You cannot have successful scientific cooperation without meritocracy. The great new freedom has started to entice a lot of the Arab diaspora — we have lost so many of our talented people in the past.

Is there a lesson for other Arab countries that have not experienced protests?

I think so and that’s not just the result of the Arab Spring. Slowly people have started to realise that the way forward is investment in human resources, not in cement or other commodities. And, while some of our neighbouring countries have put huge amounts into science cities and so on, ultimately it’s the working partnerships that we develop between different scientists that will make the big difference. In Jordan, our great resource is human capital and that is what we are investing in. When we think about the Arabic and Islamic world, the contribution we have made to science and technology is a very important part of our heritage, and now is the time for us to continue from where we left off.