Posts tagged Syria

Et pourtant ils créent ! (Syrie : la foi dans l’art) 

And yet they create! (Syria faith in the art)

The Institute of Islamic Cultures hosts the works of Syrian contemporary visual practices, expressions and varied writings that have in common the subsequent outbreak of the Syrian revolution. While some artists had to stop creating, others have welcomed into their works so often directly, sometimes obliquely, the violence in their country. Some even show their stubborn refusal to see the horizon of their creation reduced to war again, again and again.

Civlizations cross paths in Venice with 22 writers

Twenty two writers from Europe, Africa, Near and Far East and Latin America will be the protagonists on April 2-5 of the Venice international literature festival 'Incroci di civilta' 2014’, or crossroads of civilizations, promoted by the Ca’ Foscari university, Fondazione di Venezia and municipality. Overall, 17 countries will be represented at the festival. Among them are Saudi Arabia, with journalist Raja Alem, author of novels and books for children and born in Makka. Today she resides in Jeddah and Paris. She is considered among the most important Arab-language writers of her generation for The Dove’s Necklace, which won the prestigious International Arabic Fiction Prize in 2011, in which she describes a society dominated by brutal traditions in its difficult quest to compromise with new costumes.

Syria will also be represented in Venice with Salwa Al-Neimi, a leading contemporary Arab novelist. Born in Damascus, after graduating in Arabic language and lityerature, she moved to Paris. The 2000 Pulitzer prize winner Jhumpa Lahiri, a US writer of Indian origins will also be in Venice, along with Welsh filmmaker, screenwriter and painter Peter Greenaway and noir novelist Massimo Carlotto. 

Banksy, Elbow and Idris Elba stand together with Syria in a moving video tribute

The campaign video marks the third anniversary of the conflict.

MSF Syrian blogs are now live and feature Charlotte, an MSF psychologist, who brings to life what it’s like to work during this ongoing conflict.

MSF Syrian blogs are now live and feature Charlotte, an MSF psychologist, who brings to life what it’s like to work during this ongoing conflict.

From Inside: A Diary of Syria

It’s been almost three years of a most shocking mixture of pain and hope in Syria. While the pain manifests itself with bombardments and continuous detentions, hope manifests itself with the outburst of new creative talents.

Extraordinary young photographers and filmmakers have emerged through the professional training programme TAKWEEN: a project initiated by DOX BOX Int’l Documentary Film Festival (Syria) and the Prince Claus Fund (the Netherlands).

In order to share these unique perspectives with the rest of the world, DOX BOX and the Prince Claus Fund have created From Inside: A Diary of Syria, a photography and video blog showcasing the work of three young Syrian photographers each month. Through the ‘diary entries’, photographers and filmmakers (ages 18-25) from across Syria share their everyday lives through their words and outstanding photos.

(Photo Credits: Abd Doumany Douma – 7 November 2012/Abd Doumany Cradle of Revolution Near Damascus – 22 May 2013/Bury the Martyrs by Bassam Al-Hakeem Damascus Barzah – 12 May 2013)

SYRI-ARTS: 101 WORKS OF ART 
Syri-Arts, organized by the NGO Kayany, a Lebanese non-profit organization, which is inviting artists to donate a work of art which will be exhibited and auctioned to raise funds for the Syrian children who are the first victims of the unbearable tragedy of the war in Syria. The response has been great, from the Middle East and beyond. Artists and galleries have responded with great enthusiasm to Syri-Arts’ invitation with an exquisite array of works.
(Image Credit: “Dreamland II, Upekkha series” by Nermine Hammam)

SYRI-ARTS: 101 WORKS OF ART

Syri-Arts, organized by the NGO Kayany, a Lebanese non-profit organization, which is inviting artists to donate a work of art which will be exhibited and auctioned to raise funds for the Syrian children who are the first victims of the unbearable tragedy of the war in Syria. The response has been great, from the Middle East and beyond. Artists and galleries have responded with great enthusiasm to Syri-Arts’ invitation with an exquisite array of works.

(Image Credit: “Dreamland II, Upekkha series” by Nermine Hammam)

CREATIVE DISSENT: ARTS OF THE ARAB WORLD UPRISINGS

This exhibit explores the visual arts and other expressive media of the recent Arab World Uprisings.

Images are often used as communicative devices to present politicized messages. During the recent Arab World uprisings, demonstrators created images to express opposition to incumbent governments and members of the ruling elite. Over and again, activists, protesters, artists, and other individuals adopted the expressive media—including videos, photographs, painted and digital images, as well as slogans, music, and even puppets—to create visualized and performed modes of dissent within public space, both in the streets and online.

Creative Dissent: Arts of the Arab World Uprisings will be on display at the Arab American National Museum, November 8, 2013 - February 9, 2014. Lower Level Gallery, free with Museum admission.

SYRIA: A SILENCED SCREAM
In the early, initially peaceful stages of the Syrian uprising, a group of activist artists named “The Syrian People Know Their Way” sought to disseminate powerful imagery, clever both visually and intellectually, protesting the regime of Bashar Al-Assad.
Their distinctive posters, produced collectively both inside and outside Syria via the Internet, challenge nearly 50 years of Ba’athist propaganda and allow viewers to examine the political reality of Syria through the perspective of the strugglers, rather than through the prism of the values of the Western world.
Making its U.S. debut, Syria: A Silenced Scream, reveals the struggle of the resistance artists who have since been silenced. The exhibition opens at a time when estimated 100,000 people have died in the Syrian conflict. Designed as an archive, the exhibition memorializes the movement for generations to come.
Presented by the Middle East Center for the Arts (MECA), in collaboration with the Research Gallery, Master’s Program of Integrated Design at the Holon Institute of Technology, on Mana Contemporary’s first floor. On view through Nov. 16, 2013.
(Image Arabic Text: “And a Human Will Be Born Among Us”)

SYRIA: A SILENCED SCREAM

In the early, initially peaceful stages of the Syrian uprising, a group of activist artists named “The Syrian People Know Their Way” sought to disseminate powerful imagery, clever both visually and intellectually, protesting the regime of Bashar Al-Assad.

Their distinctive posters, produced collectively both inside and outside Syria via the Internet, challenge nearly 50 years of Ba’athist propaganda and allow viewers to examine the political reality of Syria through the perspective of the strugglers, rather than through the prism of the values of the Western world.

Making its U.S. debut, Syria: A Silenced Scream, reveals the struggle of the resistance artists who have since been silenced. The exhibition opens at a time when estimated 100,000 people have died in the Syrian conflict. Designed as an archive, the exhibition memorializes the movement for generations to come.

Presented by the Middle East Center for the Arts (MECA), in collaboration with the Research Gallery, Master’s Program of Integrated Design at the Holon Institute of Technology, on Mana Contemporary’s first floor. On view through Nov. 16, 2013.

(Image Arabic Text: “And a Human Will Be Born Among Us”)

Syrian Civil War: Artists Displaced By Conflict Find Refuge (And Beauty) In Lebanese Artists’ Colony
ARA is a dynamic space for communication and creation. It is a collective community of eclectic forms of expression. We offer residency and commission artistic projects for young Syrian artists.
“With this war, Syria’s artists don’t have an emotional or physical place to work, so I offer them this,” said Raghad Mardini, a Syrian single mother of four and an accomplished civil engineer with a predilection for art. She renovated the stable in 2011 for this purpose, and runs the residency program for displaced and fleeing Syrian artists. So far she has hosted 24 artists, two at a time each month.
The Founder’s Vision
"The project arose out of my lifelong passion for a particular creative atmosphere I discovered years ago in the studios and ateliers of Damascus, an artistic eco-system which I lived and breathed and which produced so many of my favourite artists, many of them friends. The stables at Aley were a relic from the Civil War, which I found unloved like the walnut tree suffering sadly in the grounds.
As a civil engineer, I saw the opportunity to turn the stables into something beautiful and also symbolic: ruined and in trouble but still possessing an inner beauty it was impossible to mistake, and which the right amount of love and energy could revive into something productive and new. It’s a space of freedom and hope for every young Syrian artist.”
Raghad Mardini

Syrian Civil War: Artists Displaced By Conflict Find Refuge (And Beauty) In Lebanese Artists’ Colony

ARA is a dynamic space for communication and creation. It is a collective community of eclectic forms of expression. We offer residency and commission artistic projects for young Syrian artists.

“With this war, Syria’s artists don’t have an emotional or physical place to work, so I offer them this,” said Raghad Mardini, a Syrian single mother of four and an accomplished civil engineer with a predilection for art. She renovated the stable in 2011 for this purpose, and runs the residency program for displaced and fleeing Syrian artists. So far she has hosted 24 artists, two at a time each month.

The Founder’s Vision

"The project arose out of my lifelong passion for a particular creative atmosphere I discovered years ago in the studios and ateliers of Damascus, an artistic eco-system which I lived and breathed and which produced so many of my favourite artists, many of them friends. The stables at Aley were a relic from the Civil War, which I found unloved like the walnut tree suffering sadly in the grounds.

As a civil engineer, I saw the opportunity to turn the stables into something beautiful and also symbolic: ruined and in trouble but still possessing an inner beauty it was impossible to mistake, and which the right amount of love and energy could revive into something productive and new. It’s a space of freedom and hope for every young Syrian artist.”

Raghad Mardini

"We need freedom for true art": Interview with Syrian pianist Malek Jandali

When Syrians took to the streets in March 2011, they rebelled not only against the ruling Assad family, but also against the obscurantism that had been imposed on them for decades. Art as a whole, and music in particular, have played a crucial role in the paradigm shift that has accompanied the revolution, as Syrians discover their voices for the first time.

A new generation of Syrian artists Jandali said dictators fear the soft powers that can transform people’s mind, which is why they target artists and intellectuals. He has personally suffered this persecution. Though he left the country years ago, regime forces have repeatedly ransacked his Syrian home and severely beat his parents in retaliation to his anti-regime activity. But the revolution has allowed for the birth of a generation of artists, breaking away from the decades of official propaganda present in art production.

YouTube Video: Syria Anthem of the Free - Malek Jandali 
ســــــــــــوريـــا نشيد الأحرار- مالك جندلي

THE SYRIAN ELECTRONIC ARMY ARE AT CYBER WAR WITH ANONYMOUS
Since protesters first took to Syria’s streets in March of 2011, the crisis has cost over 70,000 lives and displaced over a million refugees. And while Bashar al-Assad’s government continues to fight against armed opposition groups, a new war is beginning to take place online. However, this cyber-war isn’t restricted to just a room full of high-fiving neck-beards firing DDoS attacks at rebel computers, it’s having real and sometimes lethal effects on the ground.

THE SYRIAN ELECTRONIC ARMY ARE AT CYBER WAR WITH ANONYMOUS

Since protesters first took to Syria’s streets in March of 2011, the crisis has cost over 70,000 lives and displaced over a million refugees. And while Bashar al-Assad’s government continues to fight against armed opposition groups, a new war is beginning to take place online. However, this cyber-war isn’t restricted to just a room full of high-fiving neck-beards firing DDoS attacks at rebel computers, it’s having real and sometimes lethal effects on the ground.

Biography of Sheikh Taqiuddin an-Nabahani

Taqiuddin bin Ibrahim bin Mustafa bin Ismail bin Yusuf an -Nabahani (founder of Hizb ut Tahrir) belonged to Bani Nabahan and he came from a village by the name of Ajzam in Haifa in Northern Palestine. Sheikh an-Nabahani was born in the village of Ajzam in 1332 Hijri or 1914 CE. His family was known for knowledge, practice of Deen and Taqwa. His father, Sheikh Ibrahim, was a jurist and a scholar of ‘Uloom e Sharai in the Ministry of Ma’arif (Knowledge and Arts). His mother was also an expert in ‘Uloom e Sharai,’ which she obtained from her father Sheikh Yusuf an-Nabahani.

Different narrations mention his maternal grandfather Sheikh Yusuf Nabahani in these words: Yusuf bin Ismail bin Yusuf bin Hassan bin Mohammad Al Nabahani Al Shafii’ – his kunya  (nickname)  was ‘Abu al Mahasin’ and he was a poet, Sufi and a literary person.  He was considered amongst one of the best judges of his time. He served as a judge in the area of Jenin affiliated  with  Nablus. Afterwards, he transferred to Istanbul where he served as a judge in the area of Kavi Sanjaq in Mosul. Then he was appointed as the head of the royal  court in Al -Azqya and Al -Quds. And then he took charge of the Court of Rights of Beirut. He has authored forty-eight books.

Makers of War 
The arms manufacturers of Aleppo used to be ordinary men—network administrators, housepainters, professors. Then came the bloody Syrian crisis. Now they must use all their desperate creativity to supply their fellow rebels with the machinery of death.
“THESE THINGS ARE FOR KILLING PEOPLE,” HE TELLS ME. “EVERY TIME I MAKE A BOMB, I FEEL SORROW.”
By Matthieu Aikins Photographs and audio interviews by Moises Saman Audio recording by Sam Tarling and Alexander Fedyushkin

Makers of War

The arms manufacturers of Aleppo used to be ordinary men—network administrators, housepainters, professors. Then came the bloody Syrian crisis. Now they must use all their desperate creativity to supply their fellow rebels with the machinery of death.

“THESE THINGS ARE FOR KILLING PEOPLE,” HE TELLS ME. “EVERY TIME I MAKE A BOMB, I FEEL SORROW.”

By Matthieu Aikins Photographs and audio interviews by Moises Saman Audio recording by Sam Tarling and Alexander Fedyushkin

A group of Syrian female detainees in the prison of Adra on hunger strike since 1/7/2013, in response to negligence of their cases by the public prosecution of the Counter-terrorism Court, and absence of approval of their respective trials.

A group of Syrian female detainees in the prison of Adra on hunger strike since 1/7/2013, in response to negligence of their cases by the public prosecution of the Counter-terrorism Court, and absence of approval of their respective trials.

Heba Alakkad 
Things are still the same
Galerie Tanit - Beyrouth
Heba Al-Akkad‏ was born in 1981 in Damascus, Syria. She graduated from the Faculty of Fine Arts at the University of Damascus. Heba started showing her work in Syria, and then in Jordan, Lebanon, and Egypt. She was part of the exhibition “Artists from Syria Today” our gallery held in its old premises in Gefinor from March 15 till April 5, 2012.
In this exhibition 16 Syrian artists showed a work influenced by the situation in Syria. Today very little has changed and things have even gone worse, Syria is still in pain and suffering. The artist’s pop-art collages can be understood as a powerful commentary of her everyday life. This exhibition is a glimpse into her recent work, a major show with large pieces is planned mid 2014.

Heba Alakkad

Things are still the same

Galerie Tanit - Beyrouth

Heba Al-Akkad‏ was born in 1981 in Damascus, Syria. She graduated from the Faculty of Fine Arts at the University of Damascus. Heba started showing her work in Syria, and then in Jordan, Lebanon, and Egypt. She was part of the exhibition “Artists from Syria Today” our gallery held in its old premises in Gefinor from March 15 till April 5, 2012.

In this exhibition 16 Syrian artists showed a work influenced by the situation in Syria. Today very little has changed and things have even gone worse, Syria is still in pain and suffering. The artist’s pop-art collages can be understood as a powerful commentary of her everyday life. This exhibition is a glimpse into her recent work, a major show with large pieces is planned mid 2014.